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  • 1.
    Abbas, Naeem
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Electronic, Computer and Software Systems, ECS.
    Runtime Parallelisation Switching for MPEG4 Encoder on MPSoC2008Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The recent development for multimedia applications on mobile terminals raised the need for flexible and scalable computing platforms that are capable of providing considerable (application specific) computational performance within a low cost and a low energy budget. The MPSoC with multi-disciplinary approach, resolving application mapping, platform architecture and runtime management issues, provides such multiple heterogeneous, flexible processing elements. In MPSoC, the run-time manager takes the design time exploration information as an input and selects an active Pareto point based on quality requirement and available platform resources, where a Pareto point corresponds to a particular parallelization possibility of target application. To use system’s scalability at best and enhance application’s flexibility a step further, the resource management and Pareto point selection decisions need to be adjustable at run-time. This thesis work experiments run-time Pareto point switching for MPEG-4 encoder. The work involves design time exploration and then embedding of two parallelization possibilities of MPEG-4 encoder into one single component and enabling run-time switching between parallelizations, to give run-time control over adjusting performance-cost criteria and allocation de-allocation of hardware resources at run-time. The newer system has the capability to encode each video frame with different parallelization. The obtained results offer a number of operating points on Pareto curve in between the previous ones at sequence encoding level. The run-time manager can improve application performance up to 50% or can save memory bandwidth up to 15%, according to quality request.

  • 2.
    Abbasi, Jasim Aftab
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Test of Rapid Control System Development using TargetLink2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to employ and evaluate an evaluation board with the standard microprocessor freescale MPC5554EVB board for implementation of control algorithms which are created in Matlab/Simulink instead of using dSPACE prototyping hardware. The Simulink real-time model shall be compiled to the MPC5554EVB board. TargetLink is a powerful software tool which allows an automatic generation of efficient C code from Simulink and facilitates model-based control design. The goal of this thesis is to learn how to use TargetLink in a control design workflow from model to real code and what are the limitations of a microprocessor platform and to evaluate the capabilities of TargetLink to generate a working code for a generic microprocessor.

  • 3.
    Afshar, Sara
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Lock-Based Resource Sharing for Real-Time Multiprocessors2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Embedded systems are widely used in the industry and are typically resource constrained, i.e., resources such as processors, I/O devices, shared buffers or shared memory might be limited in the system. Hence, techniques that can enable an efficient usage of processor bandwidths in such systems are of great importance. Locked-based resource sharing protocols are proposed as a solution to overcome resource limitation by allowing the available resources in the system to be safely shared. In recent years, due to a dramatic enhancement in the functionality of systems, a shift from single-core processors to multi-core processors has become inevitable from an industrial perspective to tackle the raised challenges due to increased system complexity. However, the resource sharing protocols are not fully mature for multi-core processors. The two classical multi-core processor resource sharing protocols, spin-based and suspension-based protocols, although providing mutually exclusive access to resources, can introduce long blocking delays to tasks, which may be unacceptable for many industrial applications. In this thesis we enhance the performance of resource sharing protocols for partitioned scheduling, which is the de-facto scheduling standard for industrial real-time multi-core processor systems such as in AUTOSAR, in terms of timing and memory requirements.

     

    A new scheduling approach uses a resource efficient hybrid approach combining both partitioned and global scheduling where the partitioned scheduling is used to schedule the major number of tasks in the system. In such a scheduling approach applications with critical task sets use partitioned scheduling to achieve higher level of predictability. Then the unused bandwidth on each core that is remained from partitioning is used to schedule less critical task sets using global scheduling to achieve higher system utilization. These scheduling schema however lacks a proper resource sharing protocol since the existing protocols designed for partitioned and global scheduling cannot be directly applied due to the complex hybrid structure of these scheduling frameworks. In this thesis we propose a resource sharing solution for such a complex structure. Further, we provide the blocking bounds incurred to tasks under the proposed protocols and enhance the schedulability analysis, which is an essential requirement for real-time systems, with the provided blocking bounds.

  • 4.
    Ahmad, Naeem
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Modelling and optimization of sky surveillance visual sensor network2012Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A Visual Sensor Network (VSN) is a distributed system of a largenumber of camera sensor nodes. The main components of a camera sensornode are image sensor, embedded processor, wireless transceiver and energysupply. The major difference between a VSN and an ordinary sensor networkis that a VSN generates two dimensional data in the form of an image, whichcan be exploited in many useful applications. Some of the potentialapplication examples of VSNs include environment monitoring, surveillance,structural monitoring, traffic monitoring, and industrial automation.However, the VSNs also raise new challenges. They generate large amount ofdata which require higher processing powers, large bandwidth requirementsand more energy resources but the main constraint is that the VSN nodes arelimited in these resources.This research focuses on the development of a VSN model to track thelarge birds such as Golden Eagle in the sky. The model explores a number ofcamera sensors along with optics such as lens of suitable focal length whichensures a minimum required resolution of a bird, flying at the highestaltitude. The combination of a camera sensor and a lens formulate amonitoring node. The camera node model is used to optimize the placementof the nodes for full coverage of a given area above a required lower altitude.The model also presents the solution to minimize the cost (number of sensornodes) to fully cover a given area between the two required extremes, higherand lower altitudes, in terms of camera sensor, lens focal length, camera nodeplacement and actual number of nodes for sky surveillance.The area covered by a VSN can be increased by increasing the highermonitoring altitude and/or decreasing the lower monitoring altitude.However, it also increases the cost of the VSN. The desirable objective is toincrease the covered area but decrease the cost. This objective is achieved byusing optimization techniques to design a heterogeneous VSN. The core ideais to divide a given monitoring range of altitudes into a number of sub-rangesof altitudes. The sub-ranges of monitoring altitudes are covered by individualsub VSNs, the VSN1 covers the lower sub-range of altitudes, the VSN2 coversthe next higher sub-range of altitudes and so on, such that a minimum cost isused to monitor a given area.To verify the concepts, developed to design the VSN model, and theoptimization techniques to decrease the VSN cost, the measurements areperformed with actual cameras and optics. The laptop machines are used withthe camera nodes as data storage and analysis platforms. The area coverage ismeasured at the desired lower altitude limits of homogeneous as well asheterogeneous VSNs and verified for 100% coverage. Similarly, the minimumresolution is measured at the desired higher altitude limits of homogeneous aswell as heterogeneous VSNs to ensure that the models are able to track thebird at these highest altitudes.

  • 5.
    Ahmad, Naeem
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Imran, Muhammad
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Khursheed, Khursheed
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Lawal, Najeem
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    O'Nils, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Model, placement optimization and verification of a sky surveillance visual sensor network2013In: International Journal of Space-Based and Situated Computing (IJSSC), ISSN 2044-4893, E-ISSN 2044-4907, Vol. 3, no 3, 125-135 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A visual sensor network (VSN) is a distributed system of a large number of camera nodes, which generates two dimensional data. This paper presents a model of a VSN to track large birds, such as golden eagle, in the sky. The model optimises the placement of camera nodes in VSN. A camera node is modelled as a function of lens focal length and camera sensor. The VSN provides full coverage between two altitude limits. The model can be used to minimise the number of sensor nodes for any given camera sensor, by exploring the focal lengths that fulfils both the full coverage and minimum object size requirement. For the case of large bird surveillance, 100% coverage is achieved for relevant altitudes using 20 camera nodes per km² for the investigated camera sensors. A real VSN is designed and measurements of VSN parameters are performed. The results obtained verify the VSN model.

  • 6.
    Ahmad, Naeem
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Khursheed, Khursheed
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Imran, Muhammad
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Lawal, Najeem
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    O'Nils, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Cost Optimization of a Sky Surveillance Visual Sensor Network2012In: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, Belgium: SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2012, Art. no. 84370U- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Visual Sensor Network (VSN) is a network of spatially distributed cameras. The primary difference between VSN and other type of sensor network is the nature and volume of information. A VSN generally consists of cameras, communication, storage and central computer, where image data from multiple cameras is processed and fused. In this paper, we use optimization techniques to reduce the cost as derived by a model of a VSN to track large birds, such as Golden Eagle, in the sky. The core idea is to divide a given monitoring range of altitudes into a number of sub-ranges of altitudes. The sub-ranges of altitudes are monitored by individual VSNs, VSN1 monitors lower range, VSN2 monitors next higher and so on, such that a minimum cost is used to monitor a given area. The VSNs may use similar or different types of cameras but different optical components, thus, forming a heterogeneous network.  We have calculated the cost required to cover a given area by considering an altitudes range as single element and also by dividing it into sub-ranges. To cover a given area with given altitudes range, with a single VSN requires 694 camera nodes in comparison to dividing this range into sub-ranges of altitudes, which requires only 96 nodes, which is 86% reduction in the cost.

  • 7.
    Ahmad, Naeem
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Khursheed, Khursheed
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Imran, Muhammad
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Lawal, Najeem
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    O'Nils, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Modeling and Verification of a Heterogeneous Sky Surveillance Visual Sensor Network2013In: International Journal of Distributed Sensor Networks, ISSN 1550-1329, E-ISSN 1550-1477, Art. id. 490489- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A visual sensor network (VSN) is a distributed system of a large number of camera nodes and has useful applications in many areas. The primary difference between a VSN and an ordinary scalar sensor network is the nature and volume of the information. In contrast to scalar sensor networks, a VSN generates two-dimensional data in the form of images. In this paper, we design a heterogeneous VSN to reduce the implementation cost required for the surveillance of a given area between two altitude limits. The VSN is designed by combining three sub-VSNs, which results in a heterogeneous VSN. Measurements are performed to verify full coverage and minimum achieved object image resolution at the lower and higher altitudes, respectively, for each sub-VSN. Verification of the sub-VSNs also verifies the full coverage of the heterogeneous VSN, between the given altitudes limits. Results show that the heterogeneous VSN is very effective to decrease the implementation cost required for the coverage of a given area. More than 70% decrease in cost is achieved by using a heterogeneous VSN to cover a given area, in comparison to homogeneous VSN. © 2013 Naeem Ahmad et al.

  • 8.
    Ahmad, Naeem
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Lawal, Najeem
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    O'Nils, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Oelmann, Bengt
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Imran, Muhammad
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Khursheed, Khursheed
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Model and placement optimization of a sky surveillance visual sensor network2011In: Proceedings - 2011 International Conference on Broadband and Wireless Computing, Communication and Applications, BWCCA 2011, IEEE Computer Society, 2011, 357-362 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visual Sensor Networks (VSNs) are networks which generate two dimensional data. The major difference between VSN and ordinary sensor network is the large amount of data. In VSN, a large number of camera nodes form a distributed system which can be deployed in many potential applications. In this paper we present a model of the physical parameters of a visual sensor network to track large birds, such as Golden Eagle, in the sky. The developed model is used to optimize the placement of the camera nodes in the VSN. A camera node is modeled as a function of its field of view, which is derived by the combination of the lens focal length and camera sensor. From the field of view and resolution of the sensor, a model for full coverage between two altitude limits has been developed. We show that the model can be used to minimize the number of sensor nodes for any given camera sensor, by exploring the focal lengths that both give full coverage and meet the minimum object size requirement. For the case of large bird surveillance we achieve 100% coverage for relevant altitudes using 20 camera nodes per km2 for the investigated camera sensors.

  • 9.
    Aittamaa, Simon
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Programming embedded real-time systems: implementation techniques for concurrent reactive objects2011Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An embedded system is a computer system that is a part of a larger device with hardware and mechanical parts. Such a system often has limited resources (such as processing power, memory, and power) and it typically has to meet hard real-time requirements. Today, as the area of application of embedded systems is constantly increasing, resulting in higher demands on system performance and a growing complexity of embedded software, there is a clear trend towards multi-core and multi-processor systems. Such systems are inherently concurrent, but programming concurrent systems using the traditional abstractions (i.e., explicit threads of execution) has been shown to be both difficult and error-prone. The natural solution is to raise the abstraction level and make concurrency implicit, in order to aid the programmer in the task of writing correct code. However, when we raise the abstraction level, there is always an inherent cost. In this thesis we consider one possible concurrency model, the concurrent reactive object approach that offers implicit concurrency at the object level. This model has been implemented in the programming language Timber, which primarily targets development of real-time systems. It is also implemented in TinyTimber, a subset of the C language closely matching Timber’s execution model. We quantify various costs of a TinyTimber implementation of the model (such as context switching and message passing overheads) on a number of hardware platforms and compare them to the costs of the more common thread-based approach. We then demonstrate how some of these costs can be mitigated using stack resource policy. On a separate track, we present a feasibility test for garbage collection in a reactive real-time system with automatic memory management, which is a necessary component for verification of correctness of a real-time system implemented in Timber

  • 10.
    Aittamaa, Simon
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Computer Science, Electrical and Space Engineering, Embedded Internet Systems Lab.
    Eriksson, Johan
    Lindgren, Per
    Uniform scheduling of internal and external events under SRP-EDF2010In: Annual International Conference on Real-Time and Embedded Systems ( RTES 2010): 1-2 November 2010, Mandarin Orchard Hotel, Singapore, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the growing complexity of modern embedded real-time systems, scheduling and managing of resources has become a daunting task. While scheduling and resource management for internal events can be simplified by adopting a commonplace real-time operating system (RTOS), scheduling and resource management for external events are left in the hands of the programmer, not to mention managing resources across the boundaries of external and internal events. In this paper we propose a unified system view incorporating earliest deadline first (EDF) for scheduling and stack resource policy (SRP) for resource management. From an embedded real-time system view, EDF+SRP is attractive not only because stack usage can be minimized, but also because the cost of a pre-emption becomes almost as cheap as a regular function call, and the number of preemptions is kept to a minimum. SRP+EDF also lifts the burden of manual resource management from the programmer and incorporates it into the scheduler. Furthermore, we show the efficiency of the SRP+EDF scheme, the intuitiveness of the programming model (in terms of reactive programming), and the simplicity of the implementation.

  • 11.
    Al Hayani, Musab
    Halmstad University, School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering (IDE).
    Modeling Bus Load on CAN2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The existence of high load and latency in the CAN bus network would indeed lead to a situation where a given message crosses its deadline; this situation would disturb the continuity of the required service as well as activating fault codes due to delay of message delivery, which might lead to system failure.

    The outcome and goal of this thesis is to research and formulate methods to determine and model busload and latencies, by determining parameters such as alpha and breakdown utilization, which are considered as indications to the start of network breakdown when a given message in a dataset start to introduce latency by crossing its deadline which are totally prohibited in critical real time communications.

    The final goal of this master thesis is to develop a TOOL for calculating, modeling, determining and visualizing worst case busload, throughput, networks’ breakdown points and worst case latency in Scania CAN bus networks which is based on the J1939 protocol.

    SCANLA (The developed CAN busload analyzer tool in this thesis) is running as an executable application and uses a Graphical User Interface as a human-computer interface (i.e., a way for humans to interact with the tool) that useswindows,icons and menus and which can be manipulated by a mouse.

  • 12.
    Al Mamun, Abdullah
    et al.
    Division of Software Engineering Chalmers University of Technology and University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Berger, Christian
    Division of Software Engineering Chalmers University of Technology and University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hansson, Jörgen
    University of Skövde, School of Informatics. University of Skövde, The Informatics Research Centre.
    Explicating, Understanding and Managing Technical Debt from Self-Driving Miniature Car Projects2014In: Proceedings 2014 6th IEEE International Workshop on Managing Technical Debt: MTD 2014, Los Alamitos, CA: IEEE Computer Society, 2014, 11-18 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technical debt refers to various weaknesses in the design or implementation of a system resulting from trade-offs during software development usually for a quick release. Accumulating such debt over time without reducing it can seriously hamper the reusability and maintainability of the software. The aim of this study is to understand the state of the technical debt in the development of self-driving miniature cars so that proper actions can be planned to reduce the debt to have more reusable and maintainable software. A case study on a selected feature from two self-driving miniature car development projects is performed to assess the technical debt. Additionally, an interview study is conducted involving the developers to relate the findings of the case study with the possible root causes. The result of the study indicates that "the lack of knowledge" is not the primary reason for the accumulation of technical debt from the selected code smells. The root causes are rather in factors like time pressure followed by issues related to software/hardware integration and incomplete refactoring as well as reuse of legacy, third party, or open source code.

  • 13.
    Alam, Ashraful
    Halmstad University, School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering (IDE).
    Parallelization of the Estimation Algorithm of the 3D Structure Tensor2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis work provides the implementation of 3D structure tensor on a Massively Parallel Processor Array (MPPA), Ambric 2045.

     

    The 3D structure tensor algorithm is often used in image processing applications to compute the optical flow or to detect local 3D structures and their directions. The 3D structure tensor algorithm (3D-STA) consists of three main parts: gradient, tensor and smoothing. This algorithm is computationally expensive due to many multiplications and additions which are required to calculate the gradient (edge), the tensor and to smooth every pixel of the image. This is why this algorithm is very slow to run on a single processor. Therefore, it is important to make it parallel for high performance computation.

     

    This thesis provides two parallel implementations of 3D-STA; namely coarse-grained parallelism and fine-grained parallelism. Ambric has 336 processors. Only 49 processors are used in coarse-grained implementation and 165 processors are used in fine-grained implementation. The performance of the two implementations is measured using a video stream input, consisting of a sequence of images of size 20x256x256. The performance of the coarse-grained parallelism implementation is 25 frames per second (fps) and the one of the fine-grained parallelism implementation is 100 fps. Thus the fine-grained version is four time faster than the coarse-grained one.

     

    Additionally, the results are compared with the result of the Matlab implementation, running on Intel(R) Core 2 duo @2.10 GHz processor and also compared with another parallel optical flow implementation, in terms of speed and efficiency. The coarse-grained implementation is 58 times faster than the Matlab implementation and it achieves approximately half of the performance of the other parallel optical flow implementation. On the other hand, the fine-grained implementation is 230 times faster than the Matlab implementation and more than twice as (100/43) fast as the other parallel optical flow implementation.

     

    These performance results are satisfactory and the results that our parallel implementations can be considered for real-time applications.

     

  • 14.
    Alam, Ashraful
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering (IDE).
    Ul-Abdin, Zain
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Centre for Research on Embedded Systems (CERES).
    Svensson, Bertil
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Centre for Research on Embedded Systems (CERES).
    Parallelization of the Estimation Algorithm of the 3D Structure Tensor2012In: 2012 International Conference on Reconfigurable Computing and FPGAs, ReConFig 2012 / [ed] Peter Athanas, René Cumplido & Eduardo de la Torre, Piscataway, N.J.: IEEE Press, 2012, 6416771Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The three dimensional structure tensor algorithm (3D-STA) is often used in image processing applications to compute the optical flow or to detect local 3D structures and their directions. This algorithm is computationally expensive due to many computations that are required to calculate the gradient, the tensor, and to smooth every pixel of the image frames. Therefore, it is important to parallelize the implementation to achieve high performance. In this paper we present two parallel implementations of 3D-STA; namely moderately parallelized and highly parallelized implementation, on a massively parallel reconfigurable array. Finally, we evaluate the performance of the generated code and results are compared with another optical flow implementation. The throughput achieved by the moderately parallelized implementation is approximately half of the throughput of the Optical flow implementation, whereas the highly parallelized implementation results in a 2x gain in throughput as compared to the optical flow implementation. © 2012 IEEE.

  • 15.
    Alam, Assad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Asplund, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Behere, Sagar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Björk, Mattias
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Garcia Alonso, Liliana
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Khaksari, Farzad
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Signal Processing.
    Khan, Altamash
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Signal Processing.
    Kjellberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Liang, Kuo-Yun
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Lyberger, Rickard
    Scania CV AB.
    Mårtensson, Jonas
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
    Nilsson, John-Olof
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Signal Processing.
    Pettersson, Henrik
    Scania CV AB.
    Pettersson, Simon
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Stålklinga, Elin
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Sundman, Dennis
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Signal Processing.
    Zachariah, Dave
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Signal Processing.
    Cooperative driving according to Scoop2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Scania are entering the GCDC 2011 under the name Scoop –Stockholm Cooperative Driving. This paper is an introduction to their team and to the technical approach theyare using in their prototype system for GCDC 2011.

  • 16.
    Alam, Mohammad Anzar
    et al.
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Thim, Jan
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Manuilskiy, Anatoliy
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    O'Nils, Mattias
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Information Technology and Media.
    Westerlind, Christina
    SCA R&D Centre, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Johan
    Iggesund Paperboard AB, Iggesund, Sweden.
    Lidén, Joar
    SCA Ortviken AB, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Investigation of the surface topographical differences between the Cross Direction and the Machine Direction for newspaper and paperboard2011In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 26, no 4, 468-475 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Paper and paperboard surface quality is constantly being improved by the industry. This improvement work deals with the essential fact that the surface topography must be measured, both in relation to offline and online measurements for the manufactured products. Most measurements relating to surface topography (especially online) are performed either in the machine direction (MD) or in the cross direction (CD). It has been the opinion of SCA Ortviken AB and Iggesund Paperboard AB that the surface topography amplitudes are almost always higher in the CD than in the MD, for their products which consist of newspaper and paperboard. This article aims to investigate the rela-tionship between the CD and the MD surface topography amplitudes for a wide range of spatial wavelength for both newspaper and paperboard. The tests and investiga-tions have been conducted using an FRT Microprof profilometer within the range 20 μm up to 8 mm, and the results confirm that the surface topography amplitudes are higher in the CD for most of the shorter spatial wavelength within this range. The results also show significant differences between measurements for different paper qualities, suggesting a requirement to investigate the relationship between the CD and the MD topography for all paper and paperboard qualities of interest for a paper or paperboard mill, before a decision is made in relation to a measurement method.

  • 17.
    Alexandersson, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nordin, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Implementation of CAN Communication Stack in AUTOSAR2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the automotive industry today, embedded systems have reached a level of complexity which is not maintainable with the traditional approach of design- ing automotive embedded systems. For this purpose, many of the worlds leading automotive manufacturers have formed an alliance to apprehend this problem. This has resulted in AUTOSAR, an open standardized architecture for automotive embedded systems, which strives for increased flexibility and safety regulations. This thesis will explore the possibilities of implementing a CAN Communication stack using the AUTOSAR architecture and its corresponding methodology. As a result of this thesis, a complete AUTOSAR CAN communication stack has been implemented, as well has a simulator application with the purpose of testing its functionality. 

  • 18.
    Allén, Tobias
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer and Electrical Engineering.
    Wern, Daniel
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer and Electrical Engineering.
    Utveckling av applikationsplattform för inbyggt system2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 19.
    Al-Otaibi, Ahmad
    et al.
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer and Electrical Engineering.
    Hamed Oraibi, Yaser
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer and Electrical Engineering.
    AUTOMOTIVE BUS SYSTEM SCALABILITY2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Purpose: The purpose of these theses is to build a deep understanding of CAN-FD and how does it work in the network.

    Method:The methods are literature studies that build on scientific books, data sheets, white papers, articles and interviews. 

    Findings: This research shows that the scalability of CAN-FD is the same in Classic CAN. Supporting high bit rate and increasing the bandwidth for CAN-FD is the only gap between them. In addition, the result shows that the CAN-FD doesn’t work on Partial Networks.

    Implications: The idea of this report was interesting for the companies that have needs for CAN-FD, which help to increase their knowledge about CAN-FD.

    Limitations: A Qualitative method was a useful method to reach the needs of this study. This method leads to real results that have been done in the other studies. The only missing for the authors is the scientific research that could build on real experiments and measurements on the hardware or software was not available under this research and this could lead to more clear results.

    Limitations: A Qualitative method was a useful method to reach the needs of this study. This method leads to real results that have been done in the other studies. The only missing for the authors is the scientific research that could build on real experiments and measurements on the hardware or software was not available under this research and this could lead to more clear results.

  • 20.
    Alterbeck, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Förbrukningsreduktion: Ett alternativ till gasturbiner som snabb aktiv störningsreserv?2014Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The gas turbines in the Swedish secondary reserve are reaching the end of their technical lifetime, hence alternative solutions need to be considered. One of the solutions thought to have the greatest potential is the use of so called consumptionreduction. By entering contracts with large consumers, agreements are made to reduce consumption in the event of major disturbances in the power system and thus being used as a secondary reserve. This thesis investigates the feasibility of consumption reduction as part of the secondary reserve. This has been achieved by developing a requirement specification for the disturbance reserve and by studying the technical and economic potential for consumption reduction among a range of consumers.The technical potential for consumption reduction that fulfils the requirements for participating in the secondary reserve are on average 750 MW in SE 3 and 98 MW in SE 4. The result of this study shows that consumption reduction could work as a supplement to the gas turbines, but could not entirely replace the current solution. Furthermore, replacing the gas turbines would cause loss of features such as black start and automatic frequency regulation. Nevertheless, consumption reduction is considered as a workable solution for the disturbance reserve that is both cheaper and more environmentally friendly. Before launching consumption reduction as a reserve, a market model has to be developed, taking the findings of this thesis into account: high electricity prices have negative effect on availability and that low liquidity on the market causes short endurance.

  • 21.
    Amanda, Nordhamn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computer Systems.
    Design and implementation of a demonstrator for a Bluetooth Low Energy based fleet service system for hand-held gardening and forestry products2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today, large companies specialized in forestry or park maintenance may own very large machine fleets consisting of hundreds of trimmers, chainsaws and brush cutters. Husqvarna Group, whose core business lies within high-end forestry and gardening products, has noticed that such companies tend to buy cheaper, low quality forestry and gardening products. The reason is thought to be that the companies lack a proper overview of the service status and utilization levels of their machines, leading to insufficient service, causing machines to break prematurely and making it hard to motivate investments in more expensive products. Hence, the companies usually adopt a consumerist approach, and buy cheaper products that are thrown away upon breaking.

    To make their products more attractive to machine park owners, Husqvarna want to explore the area of Internet of Things and equip their machines with sensing and communication capabilities. Collected data could be used to provide an overview of machine usage and service requirements to the machine parks owners, and could make it easier for machine park owners to dimension their machine fleet. In addition to this, a machine monitoring system where specific operator behavior can be tracked could enable identification of operators who consistently mistreat their machines by, for example, running the machine engine at non-optimal rotation speeds.

    In this master's thesis, a demonstrator of the working principle of a Bluetooth Low Energy based Fleet Service System is designed and implemented, complete with an evaluation of if received signal strength indicator (RSSI) is a good enough distance estimator to determine which operator operates a certain machine. 

    Experiments carried out indicate that while RSSI is not a good estimator of distance, it could be used to determine the operator in closest proximity given that operators are not allowed to work closer than within a 10 m radius of each other.

  • 22.
    Andersson, Erik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Electronics System.
    Olsson, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Electronics System.
    Linearization of Power Amplifier using Digital Predistortion, Implementation on FPGA2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this thesis is to linearize a power amplifier using digital predistortion. A power amplifier is a nonlinear system, meaning that when fed with a pure input signal the output will be distorted. The idea behind digital predistortion is to distort the signal before feeding it to the power amplifier. The combined distortions from the predistorter and the power amplifier will then ideally cancel each other. In this thesis, two different approaches are investigated and implemented on an FPGA. The first approach uses a nonlinear model that tries to cancel out the nonlinearities of the power amplifier. The second approach is model-free and instead makes use of a look-up table that maps the input to a distorted output. Both approaches are made adaptive so that the parameters are continuously updated using adaptive algorithms. First the two approaches are simulated and tested thoroughly with different parameters and with a power amplifier model extracted from the real amplifier. The results are shown satisfactory in the simulations, giving good linearization for both the model and the model-free technique. The two techniques are then implemented on an FPGA and tested on the power amplifier. Even though the results are not as well as in the simulations, the system gets more linear for both the approaches. The results vary widely due to different circumstances such as input frequency and power. Typically, the distortions can be attenuated with around 10 dB. When comparing the two techniques with each other, the model-free method shows slightly better results.

  • 23.
    Andersson, Isak
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Electronics System. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karlsson, Melki
    Linköping University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Electronics System. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Body Coupled Communication: Ändring av prototypkort2014Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10,5 credits / 16 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Communication using the human body as a transmission medium, the capacitive coupling between the skin and sensor, has been an active research area for PAN (Personal Area Network) since Thomas Guthrie Zimmerman introduced the technique in 1995. The reason for this is to examine the benefits and uses of a communication method that does not emit RF signals and thus reduce the risk of unauthorized interception.

    This report describes a thesis that examines the possibility of elimination of USB to UART converter on Microchip BodyCom through software USB-stack and combine this with Body Coupled Communication functionality in a single microcontroller. Furthermore, studies on if the application code in Body Coupled Communication transmitters can be modified to extend functionality.

    It was given in the conditions that microcontrollers from Microchip should be used, furthermore, low price and low power consumption were important, especially for the transmitter. The method for achieving this has been the use of Microchip BodyCom development kit with USB Microchip low pin count development kit and Microchip USB firmware framework.

    The result was that the USB- to UART-converter could be integrated with Microchip BodyCom, using software USB-stack and a modified program code for BodyCom in a single microcontroller.

    Only your imagination sets the limits for Body Coupled Communication can be used for. For example, it would be possible to exchange electronic business cards by a handshake or open a locked door only by using the handle.

  • 24.
    Andersson, Karl
    Mid Sweden University, Faculty of Science, Technology and Media, Department of Electronics Design.
    Intelligent control system for street lighting2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Street lighting is an important aspect of infrastructure in terms of both safety and comfort, but it also consumes a lot of energy. Unused light is a waste of energy, and without any form of control of the street lighting, this problem will continue to increase along with the expansion of road networks. The aim of this thesis is to propose an intelligent control system for street lighting that can adapt to the velocity of individual road users, to investigate if this could provide ways to improve the efficiency of street lighting. Previous control approaches include systems based on ambient light intensity or presence of road users, but no studies were found in which illumination adapts to the velocity of road users. The project involves three main steps, including a literature review, a system implementation and evaluation. In the proposed system, street lights cooperate to detect road users and calculate their velocities in order to adapt the illumination and make it follow their movement. It can be concluded from the evaluation results that the velocity readings help further optimize the illumination control in comparison to systems that do not consider velocity. The velocity readings make it possible to only illuminate the roadway in the direction of travel, while also adapting the distance of illumination to the recorded speed. The proposed control scheme is considered a viable solution for reducing the amount of unused light, consequently reducing the energy consumption of street lighting.

  • 25.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Sjöström, Emil
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    COMPARISON OF TIME- AND EVENT-TRIGGERED STRATEGIES FOR WIRELESS COMMUNICATION IN EMBEDDED SYSTEMS: Design of a lab assignment for university level course on data communication in embedded systems2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Embedded systems (ESs) and wireless technologies are in constant rapid development and therefore it is important to educate people in these subjects. This thesis work has the goal of developing a lab assignment for a university level course on data communication in embedded systems. Embedded systems have reliability and timeliness requirements that have to be fulfilled. These criteria pose problems to be addressed while ESs are used in conjunction with communication over wireless medium, which has some underlying limitations. These limitations come in the form of interference, degradation of signal strength with the distance and possible unwanted delays. This thesis work starts with a literature study on medium access control (MAC) methods and their possibilities for adoption of time-triggered and event-driven strategies for ESs with time constraints and continues with the lab assignment design, implementation and testing. Taking into account timing requirements brought by ESs and the specifics of the lab, i.e., limited time given to the students to solve the problem and compulsory usage of available lab equipment, a design with two communicating raspberry Pis was proposed. The system consists of a sensor node sending its readings to a controller, which is responsible for analyzing the data and actuating a set of LED lights as a response to the input data. The communication is done over a WiFi network and three different programs, organizing the communication in time-triggered, eventdriven or a combination of the two fashions are developed. Each program is tested under three environmental conditions and the results from these tests clearly show the limitation of the underlying CSMA/CA MAC adopted in WiFi and give a greater understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of different strategies for communication design.

  • 26.
    Anthony, Richard
    et al.
    University of Greenwich.
    Chen, DeJiu
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Control Systems.
    Pelc, Mariusz
    University of Greenwich.
    Persson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Control Systems.
    Törngren, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Control Systems.
    Context-Aware Adaptation in DySCAS2009In: Electronic Communications of the EASST, ISSN 1863-2122, E-ISSN 1863-2122, ISSN 1863-2122, Vol. 19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    DySCAS is a dynamically self-configuring middleware for automotivecontrol systems. The addition of autonomic, context-aware dynamic configurationto automotive control systems brings a potential for a wide range of benefits in termsof robustness, flexibility, upgrading etc. However, the automotive systems representa particularly challenging domain for the deployment of autonomics concepts, havinga combination of real-time performance constraints, severe resource limitations,safety-critical aspects and cost pressures. For these reasons current systems are staticallyconfigured. This paper describes the dynamic run-time configuration aspectsof DySCAS and focuses on the extent to which context-aware adaptation has beenachieved in DySCAS, and the ways in which the various design and implementationchallenges are met.

  • 27.
    Anthony, Richard
    et al.
    The University of Greenwich.
    Chen, DeJiu
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Systems.
    Törngren, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Systems.
    Scholle, Detlef
    Enea Data AB.
    Sanfridson, Martin
    Volvo Technology AB.
    Rettberg, Achim
    University of Paderborn/C-LAB.
    Qureshi, Tahir Naseer
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Systems.
    Persson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Systems.
    Feng, Lei
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Systems.
    Autonomic Middleware for Automotive Embedded Systems2009In: Autonomic Communication / [ed] Vasilakos, Athanasios V.; Parashar, Manish; Karnouskos, Stamatis; Pedrycz, Witold, Springer US , 2009, 169-210 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter describes DySCAS: an advanced autonomic platform-independent middleware framework for automotive embedded systems. The concepts and architecture are motivated and described in detail, focusing on the need for, and achievement of, high flexibility and automatic run-time reconfiguration. The design of the middleware is positioned with respect to the way it overcomes the specific technical, environmental, and performance challenges of the automotive domain. Self-management is achieved in terms of automatic configuration for context-aware behavior, resource-use efficiency, and self-healing to handle run-time detected faults. The self-management is governed by the use of policies distributed throughout the middleware components. The simulation techniques that have been used for extensive validation are described and some key results presented. A reference implementation is presented, illustrating the way in which the various concepts and mechanisms can be realized and orchestrated.

  • 28.
    Anthony, Richard
    et al.
    The University of Greenwich.
    Leonhardi, Alexander
    Daimler AG.
    Ekelin, Cecilia
    Volvo Technology AB.
    Chen, DeJiu
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Systems.
    Törngren, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Systems.
    de Boer, Gerrit
    Bosch GmbH.
    Jahnich, Isabell
    University of Paderborn/C-LAB.
    Burton, Simon
    Redell, Ola
    Enea Data AB.
    Weber, Alexander
    Vollmer, Vasco
    A Future Dynamically Reconfigurable Automotive Software System2008In: Proceedings of the Elektronik im Kraftfahrzeug, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Embedded software systems in vehicles are of rapidly increasing commercial importance for the automotive industry. Current systems employ a static run-time environment; due to the difficulty and cost involved in the development of dynamic systems in a high-integrity embedded control context. A dynamic system, referring to the system configuration, would greatly increase the flexibility of the offered functionality and enable customised software configuration for individual vehicles, adding customer value through plug-and-play capability, and increased quality due to its inherent ability to adjust to changes in hardware and software. We envisage an automotive system containing a variety of components, from a multitude of organizations, not necessarily known at development time. The system dynamically adapts its configuration to suit the run-time system constraints.This paper presents our vision for future automotive control systems that will be regarded in an EU research project, referred to as DySCAS (Dynamically Self-Configuring Automotive Systems). We propose a self-configuring vehicular control system architecture, with capabilities that include automatic discovery and inclusion of new devices, self-optimisation to best-use the processing, storage and communication resources available, self-diagnostics and ultimately self-healing. Such an architecture has benefits extending to reduced development and maintenance costs, improved passenger safety and comfort, and flexible owner customisation.Specifically, this paper addresses the following issues: The state of the art of embedded software systems in vehicles, emphasising the current limitations arising from fixed run-time configurations; and the benefits and challenges of dynamic configuration, giving rise to opportunities for self-healing, self-optimisation, and the automatic inclusion of users’ Consumer Electronic (CE) devices. Our proposal for a dynamically reconfigurable automotive software system platform is outlined and a typical use-case is presented as an example to exemplify the benefits of the envisioned dynamic capabilities.

  • 29.
    Anthony, Richard
    et al.
    The University of Greenwich.
    Rettberg, Achim
    University of Paderborn/C-LAB.
    Chen, DeJiu
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Control Systems.
    Jahnich, Isabell
    University of Paderborn/C-LAB.
    de Boer, Gerrit
    Bosch GmbH.
    Ekelin, Cecilia
    Volvo Technology AB.
    Towards a Dynamically Reconfigurable Automotive Control System Architecture2007In: Embedded System Design: Topics, Techniques and Trends, 2007, 71-84 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a vehicular control system architecture that supports self-configuration. The architecture is based on dynamic mapping of processes and services to resources to meet the challenges of future demanding use-scenarios in which systems must be flexible to exhibit context-aware behaviour and to permit customization. The architecture comprises a number of low-level services that will provide the required system functionalities, which include automatic discovery and incorporation of new devices, self-optimisation to best-use the processing, storage and communication resources available, and self-diagnostics. The benefits and challenges of dynamic configuration and the automatic inclusion of users' Consumer Electronic (CE) devices are briefly discussed and the self-management and control-theoretic technologies that will be used are described in outline. A number of generic use-cases have been identified, each with several specific use-case scenarios. To demonstrate the extent of the flexible reconfiguration facilitated by the architecture, some of these use-cases are described, each exemplifying a different aspect of dynamic reconfiguration.

  • 30.
    Anthony, Richard
    et al.
    The University of Greenwich.
    Ward, Paul
    The University of Greenwich.
    Chen, DeJiu
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Systems.
    Hawthorne, James
    The University of Greenwich.
    Mariusz, Pelc
    The University of Greenwich.
    Rettberg, Achim
    University of Paderborn/C-LAB.
    Törngren, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Systems.
    A Middleware Approach to Dynamically Configurable Automotive Embedded Systems2008In: ISVCS 2008: The First Annual International ICST Symposium on Vehicular Computing Systems, EUDL - European Union Digital Library , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an advanced dynamically configurable middleware for automotive embedded systems. The layered architecture of the middleware, and the way in which core and optional services provide transparency and flexible platform independent support for portability, is described. The design of the middleware is positioned with respect to the way it overcomes the specific technical, environmental, performance and safety challenges of the automotive domain. The use of policies to achieve flexible run-time configuration is explained with reference to the core policy technology which has been extended and adapted specifically for this project. The component model is described, focussing on how the configuration logic is distributed throughout the middleware and application components, by inserting ‘decision points’ wherever deferred logic or run-time context-sensitive configuration is required. Included in this discussion are the way in which context information is automatically provided to policies to inform context-aware behaviour; the dynamic wrapper mechanism which isolates policies, provides transparency to software developers and silently handles run-time errors arising during dynamic configuration operations.

  • 31. Anwar, Hassan
    et al.
    Jafri, Syed Mohammad Asad Hassan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Electronic Systems.
    Sergei, Dytckov
    Daneshtalab, Masoud
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Electronic Systems.
    Hemani, Ahmed
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Electronic Systems.
    Plosila, Juha
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Tenhunen, Hannu
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Electronic Systems.
    Exploring Spiking Neural Network on Coarse-Grain Reconfigurable Architectures2014In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, 2014, 64-67 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, reconfigurable architectures are becoming increas- ingly popular as the candidate platforms for neural net- works. Existing works, that map neural networks on re- configurable architectures, only address either FPGAs or Networks-on-chip, without any reference to the Coarse-Grain Reconfigurable Architectures (CGRAs). In this paper we investigate the overheads imposed by implementing spiking neural networks on a Coarse Grained Reconfigurable Ar- chitecture (CGRAs). Experimental results (using point to point connectivity) reveal that up to 1000 neurons can be connected, with an average response time of 4.4 msec.

  • 32.
    Aramrattana, Maytheewat
    et al.
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Centre for Research on Embedded Systems (CERES). The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Linköping, Sweden.
    Larsson, Tony
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), Centre for Research on Embedded Systems (CERES).
    Jansson, Jonas
    The Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI), Linköping, Sweden.
    Englund, Cristofer
    Halmstad University, School of Information Technology, Halmstad Embedded and Intelligent Systems Research (EIS), CAISR - Center for Applied Intelligent Systems Research. Viktoria Swedish ICT, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dimensions of Cooperative Driving, ITS and Automation2015In: 2015 IEEE Intelligent Vehicles Symposium (IV), Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2015, 144-149 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wireless technology supporting vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V), and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communication, allow vehicles and infrastructures to exchange information, and cooperate. Cooperation among the actors in an intelligent transport system (ITS) can introduce several benefits, for instance, increase safety, comfort, efficiency. Automation has also evolved in vehicle control and active safety functions. Combining cooperation and automation would enable more advanced functions such as automated highway merge and negotiating right-of-way in a cooperative intersection. However, the combination have influences on the structure of the overall transport systems as well as on its behaviour. In order to provide a common understanding of such systems, this paper presents an analysis of cooperative ITS (C-ITS) with regard to dimensions of cooperation. It also presents possible influence on driving behaviour and challenges in deployment and automation of C-ITS.

  • 33.
    Armengaud, Eric
    et al.
    Virtual Vehicle Competence Center, Austria.
    Zoier, Markus
    Virtual Vehicle Competence Center, Austria.
    Baumgart, Andreas
    OFFIS E. V., Germany.
    Biehl, Matthias
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Chen, De Jiu
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Embedded Control Systems.
    Griessnig, Gerhard
    AVL List GmbH, Austria; Graz University of Technology, Austria.
    Hein, Christian
    Fraunhofer FOKUS, Germany.
    Ritter, Tom
    Fraunhofer FOKUS, Germany.
    Tavakoli-Kolagari, Ramin
    Volvo Technology Corporation, Sweden.
    Model-based Toolchain for the Efficient Development of Safety-Relevant Automotive Embedded Systems2011In: SAE Technical Paper: Paper Number: 2011-01-0056, Society of Automotive Engineers, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advanced functionalities unthinkable a few decades ago are now being introduced into automotive vehicles through embedded systems for reasons like emission control, vehicle connectivity, safety and cooperative behaviors. As the development often involves stakeholders from different engineering disciplines and organizations, the complexity due to shared requirements, interdependencies of data, functions, and resources, as well as tight constraints in regards to timing, safety, and resource efficiency makes the system integration, quality control and assurance, reuse and change management increasingly more difficult. This calls for a more rigorous approach to the development of automotive embedded systems and components. This paper describes the CESAR reference technology platform (RTP) that supports the formalization of various engineering concerns in the development of safety-relevant embedded systems and thereby a model-based integration of various tools and methods to form seamless environments or toolchains for the development of such systems.

  • 34.
    Asadi, Nima
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Enhancing the Monitoring of Real-Time Performance in Linux2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There is a growing trend in applying Linux operating system in the domain of embeddedsystems. This is due to the important features that Linux benets from, such as beingopen source, its light weight compared to other major operating systems, its adaptabilityto dierent platforms, and its more stable performance speed. However, there are up-grades that still need to be done in order to use Linux for real-time purposes. A numberof dierent approaches have been suggested in order to improve Linux's performance inreal-time environment. Nevertheless, proposing a correct-by-construction system is verydicult in real-time environment, mainly due to the complexity and unpredictability ofthem. Thus, run-time monitoring can be a helpful approach in order to provide the userwith data regarding to the actual timing behavior of the system which can be used foranalysis and modication of it. In this thesis work, a design for run-time monitoringis suggested and implemented on a real-time scheduler module that assists Linux withreal-time tasks. Besides providing crucial data regarding the timing performance of thesystem, this monitor predicts violations of timing requirements based on the currenttrace of the system performance.

  • 35.
    Ashjaei, Mohammad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering. Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Multi-Hop Real-Time Communication over Switched Ethernet Technology2014Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Switched Ethernet technology has been introduced to be exploited in real-time communication systems due to its features such as its high throughput and wide availability, hence being a cost-effective solution. Many real-time switched Ethernet protocols have been developed, preserving the profits of traditional Ethernet technology, to overcome the limitations imposed by using commercially available (COTS) switches. These limitations mainly originate from the non-deterministic behavior of the Ethernet switches inherent in the use of FIFO queues and a limited number of priority levels.

     

    In our research we focus on two particular real-time communication technologies, one based on COTS Ethernet switches named the FTT-SE architecture and the other using a modified Ethernet switch called the HaRTES architecture. Both architectures are based on a master-slave technique supporting different and temporally isolated traffic types including real-time periodic, real-time sporadic and non-real-time traffic. Also, they provide mechanisms implementing adaptivity as a response to the requirements imposed by dynamic real-time applications. Nevertheless, the two mentioned architectures were originally developed for a simple network consisting of a single switch, and they were lacking support for multi-hop communication. In industrial applications, multi-hop communication is essential as the networks comprise a high number of nodes, that is far beyond the capability of a single switch.

     

    In this thesis, we study the challenges of building multi-hop communication using the FTT-SE and the HaRTES architectures. We propose different architectures to provide multi-hop communication while preserving the key characteristics of the single-switch architecture such as timeliness guarantee, resource efficiency, adaptivity and dynamicity. We develop a response time analysis for each proposed architecture and we compare them to assess their corresponding benefits and limitations. Further, we develop a simulation tool to evaluate the solutions.

  • 36.
    Ashjaei, Mohammad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Real-Time Communication over Switched Ethernet with Resource Reservation2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the need for advanced computer-controlled functionality in distributed embedded systems the requirements on network communication are becoming overly intricate. This dissertation targets the requirements that are concerned with real-time guarantees, run-time adaptation, resource utilization and flexibility during the development. The Flexible Time-Triggered Switched Ethernet (FTT-SE) and Hard Real-Time Ethernet Switching (HaRTES) network architectures have emerged as two promising solutions that can cater for these requirements. However, these architectures do not support multi-hop communication as they are originally developed for single-switch networks. This dissertation presents a fundamental contribution in multi-hop real-time communication over the FTT-SE and HaRTES architectures targeting the above mentioned requirements. It proposes and evaluates various solutions for scheduling and forwarding the traffic through multiple switches in these architectures. These solutions preserve the ability of dynamic adaptation without jeopardizing real-time properties of the architectures. Moreover, the dissertation presents schedulability analyses for the timeliness verification and evaluation of the proposed solutions as well as several protocols to support run-time adaptation in the multi-hop communication. Finally, the work led to an end-to-end resource reservation framework, based on the proposed multi-hop architectures, to support flexibility during the development of the systems. The efficiency of the proposed solutions is evaluated on various case studies that are inspired from industrial systems.

  • 37.
    Ashjaei, Mohammad
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Mubeen, Saad
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Behnam, Moris
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    Nolte, Thomas
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering, Embedded Systems.
    End-to-end Resource Reservation Model2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 38. Ask, Simon
    et al.
    Lindh, Rickard
    Design och konstruktion av roterande LiDAR-system för 360 graders objektdetektering2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Although laser rangefinder technologies have been around for decades in military, cartography, building, industrial and research applications it is only in recent years that more generally applicable and cheaper consumer grade laser range finder sensors have become available. This project investigates the possibilities and limitations of creating a mobile 360 degree, two-dimensional obstacle detection system using off-the-shelf available electronic components.

    Using a Lidar Lite 3 from Garmin Ltd., an Arduino compatible microcontroller based on Atmel 328P, a Raspberry Pi 3 from The Raspberry Pi Foundation and an electronic speed controlled brushless DC motor driving the rotation, it is shown how range data measurements can be collected, communicated, processed and displayed at measurement rates between 500 and 1000 Hz. At 5 Hz update rate of a complete 360-degree data set, this translates to a worst case angular resolution of 2.5 degrees at ranges reaching 10 meters depending on target reflectivity. Configured for these faster measurement rates, at static measurements of a white painted wall, the measurements show a standard deviation of 0.06 m at a five-meter range, going up to 0.19 m at a range of 10 meters.

    A modular and mobile prototype was designed and built. The modularity allowed testing and verification of two configurations. Configuration A uses a slip ring for power and data transfer to the rotating sensor. Configuration B allows the laser range finder to be stationary and instead rotates a first surface aluminum mirror positioned at 45 degrees above the sensor.

    The measurement results show that increasing range has a notable adversely effect on the number of successful readings in a setting demanding faster measurement rates of above 500 Hz. The number of successful readings decreases at ranges above 5 meters, and this decrease of successful readings is more pronounced in the configuration using a mirror to reflect the measurement. The mirror reflected version does on the other hand allow an electromechanically simpler, more silent and durable system.

    Using a density based clustering algorithm it is shown how person sized objects in the point cloud data can be robustly detected at ranges up to 5 meters. 

  • 39.
    Aslam, Muhammad Awais
    Jönköping University, School of Engineering, JTH, Computer and Electrical Engineering.
    Router Architecture for Junction Based Source Routing:Design and FPGA Prototyping2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The increase in the number of cores that can be integrated on a single chip has forced the designer to use computer network concepts for design of System on Chip (SoC). This idea led to development of Network on Chip (NoC) to deal with more cores on a single chip. NoC has three main parts, namely routers, link and network interface through which cores are connected to NoC. Router is one of the most important parts because cores communicate with other cores through routers. One of the important tasks for a NoC designer is to design router with low latency.Router design depends on the routing protocol and routing algorithm used. Two kinds of routing algorithms are source routing and distributed routing. In source routing, complete route information is available in Head flit while in distributed routing, routing decisions are taken inside every router on the path. Source routing has speed advantage over distributed routing because the packet itself contains the routing information. But source routing leads to overhead to store complete path information in the header of each packet. To overcome this flaw, junction based source routing has been introduced. If destination is far away from the source then first packet will go to a junction and get the new path information from the junction to the destination. Thus we need to store the path information only for a few hops in the packet header. This idea has been taken from the daily experience of train journey. In this thesis we have developed design of a router for junction based source routing. Main component of simple router includes buffering, header modification and making route decision. Router includes a table called Path Table which stores information about paths from junction to various destinations. JB router also includes, picking up the new path information from Path Table and modify the header by adding new path information.We have developed VHDL designs of two versions of the routers for Junction Based Routing. The delay performance of routers have been analysed through simulation. A simple prototype of the router has also been implemented in Altera FPGA to find out the resource requirements of the new router designs.

  • 40.
    Asplund, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Safety and Tool Integration, A System-Theoretic Process Analysis2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this report I detail a System-Theoretic Process Analysis (STPA) hazard analysis of the tool integration of development environments for embedded systems. Building on results from previous studies I generalize and expand on earlier findings regarding the relationship between safety and tool integration.

    To prepare for the analysis I customized STPA for the context of tool integration. This customization allowed me to subsequently design and analyze three versions of a tool chain originally provided by an industrial partner. A net result of 85, 98 and 73 risks was identified, in comparison to 25 integration weaknesses identified through expert knowledge. The design of the different versions of the tool chain and a comparison of the identified risks with the integration weaknesses allowed me to validate the usefulness of STPA for both identifying and correctly categorizing risks and causes in the context of tool integration. An analysis of my results also points out the fact that STPA is not a silver bullet, without enough expertise it is easy to omit important parts of process models and thus arrive at incomplete conclusions.

    In regard to the relationship between safety and tool integration nine properties were identified, properties that need to be supported correctly to avoid hazards in the context of tool integration. These properties require support throughout a noticeable part of a development environment to have an impact and derive much of that impact from the possibility to centralize them. They also interrelate, so that often several of them need to be handled to mitigate one type of risk. However, introducing support for them across a whole development environment is likely to be costly, or even impossible. Furthermore, introducing support for these properties will mitigate some risks, but also create other risks at higher levels of organization.

    These properties therefore point to the size a development environment, the number of contexts towards which the development environment can be verified and the effort required to ensure the added requirements at higher levels of organization as deciding factors on whether the effort to support them should be made (other efforts, more efficient in those particular cases, could otherwise be considered). The existence of these properties also point to the possibility of developing and pre-qualifying tools and tool chains based on the assumption that some or all of these properties will be supported by the final development environment. This could potentially lower, or at least distribute, the cost of the final qualification.

  • 41.
    Asplund, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Tool Integration and Safety: A Foundation for Analysing the Impact of Tool Integrationon Non-functional Properties2012Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing complexity of embedded systems development is becoming difficult to handle with development environments based on disjoint engineering tools. Support for interactions between various engineering tools, especially through automated means, has therefore received an increased amount of attention during the last few years. The subsequent increase in the amount of tool integration is leading to an increased impact of tool integration on non-functional properties of development efforts, development environments and end products. At the same time there is a lack of methods and tools for analysing the relationship between these properties and tool integration. To establish a foundation for analysing this generic relationship, the specific relationship between tool integration and the safety of end products is analysed in this thesis.

    A survey was conducted to analyze the State of the Art of tool integration as related to safety. This survey specifically identified the lack of an efficient handling of tool integration by modern safety standards as an important concern. In relation to this survey, three theories were identified as of specific importance. These are the school of thought known as Systems Thinking, the Systems-Theoretic Accident Model and Processes (STAMP) causality model and the System-Theoretic Process Analysis (STPA) hazard analysis technique.

    Building on these theories, this thesis provides original contributions intended to (1) describe concepts and models related to tool integration and safety (the first and second contribution), (2) link tool integration to safety in a way that reduces complexity during analysis (the third contribution) and (3) propose how to interpret and make use of the implications of the presented theories and the first three contributions (the fourth and fifth contribution).

    • The first contribution is a new conceptual model of a development effort that emphasizes tool integration.

    • The second contribution is a new reference model for tool integration in highly heterogeneous environments.

    • The third contribution consists of nine safety-related tool chain properties, i.e. properties of tool chains that could mitigate at least part of the risks introduced by tool integration.

    • The fourth contribution is a proposition on how to identify safety implications due to a high level of automation of tool integration.

    • The fifth contribution is a proposition for a new software tool qualification process.

  • 42.
    Asplund, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Biehl, Matthias
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Loiret, Frederic
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Towards the Automated Qualification of Tool Chain Design2012In: SAFECOMP 2012 Workshops: Sassur, ASCoMS, DESEC4LCCI, ERCIM/EWICS, IWDE, Magdeburg, Germany, September 25-28, 2012, Proceedings, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2012, 392-399 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of safety-critical embedded systems is supported by a number of development tools, which are increasingly integrated into automated tool chains. Safety standards require these tool chains to be qualified, which is costly and requires a large effort. To reduce cost and effort tool chains can be composed of pre-qualified tools and then themselves pre-qualified by identifying the parts of tool chain software that have an impact on safety more exactly. In this paper we propose the use of a modeling language to describe this tool chain composition. This allows us to reduce effort even further by automatically analyzing the tool chain model for safety issues. It also promises to reduce the effort and cost of later steps in the deployment of the tool chain by formalizing the communication of safety issues and automating the generation of code for tool chain software.

  • 43.
    Asplund, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    El-khoury, Jad
    Törngren, Martin
    Qualifying Software Tools, a Systems Approach2012In: Computer Safety, Reliability, and Security: 31st International Conference, SAFECOMP 2012, Magdeburg, Germany, September 25-28, 2012. Proceedings, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2012, 340-351 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern safety standards designed to ensure safety in embedded system products often take a descriptive approach, focusing on describing appropriate requirements on management, processes, methods and environments during development. While the qualification of software tools has been included in several such standards, how to handle the safety implications of tools integrated into tool chains has been largely ignored. This problem is aggravated by an increase both in automation of tool integration and the size of development environments.

    In this paper we define nine safety goals for tool chains and suggest a qualification method that takes a systems approach on certifying software tools as parts of tool chains. With this method, software tools are developed and pre-qualified under the assumption that certain properties will be supported by the development environment they are to be deployed in. The proposed method is intended to (1) achieve a stronger focus on the relevant parts of tool chains in regard to safety and (2) separate the extra effort these parts imply from the effort already stipulated by safety standards.

  • 44.
    Asplund, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    El-khoury, Jad
    Törngren, Martin
    Safety-Guided Design through System-Theoretic Process Analysis, Benefits and Difficulties2012In: 30th International System Safety Conference Proceedings, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development environments for embedded systems are moving towards increased automation between Commercial Of The Shelf (COTS) engineering tools. While automation provides new opportunities for e.g. verification, it also to some extent decreases the possibility of identifying and acting on safety issues that arise during development. To investigate the relationship between tool integration and safety we performed a System-Theoretic Process Analysis (STPA) of a tool chain from an industrial case study. This tool chain was then reanalyzed and redesigned twice, in part motivated by identified hazards.

    This paper presents our experiences from applying STPA to safety-guided design in the context of integrating COTS engineering tools into tool chains. We discuss the benefits of and difficulties with applying STPA. We also suggest improvements that complement STPA with support methods and tools.

    The primary benefit was the support in categorizing risks and causes. The three difficulties we encountered were identifying context-specific causal factors, defining control structures across several domains (management, user, technical, etc.) and limiting the domains taken into account. The use of STPA during safety-guided design would be facilitated by the use of expert systems and simulation, especially in regard to relating different domains.

  • 45.
    Asplund, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Törngren, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    The Discourse on Tool Integration Beyond Technology, A Literature Survey2015In: Journal of Systems and Software, ISSN 0164-1212, Vol. 106, 117-131 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tool integration research area emerged in the 1980s. This survey focuses on those strands of tool integration research that discuss issues beyond technology.

     

    We reveal a discourse centered around six frequently mentioned non-functional properties. These properties have been discussed in relation to technology and high level issues. However, while technical details have been covered, high level issues and, by extension, the contexts in which tool integration can be found, are treated indifferently. We conclude that this indifference needs to be challenged, and research on a larger set of stakeholders and contexts initiated.

     

    An inventory of the use of classification schemes underlines the difficulty of evolving the classical classification scheme published by Wasserman. Two frequently mentioned redefinitions are highlighted to facilitate their wider use.

     

    A closer look at the limited number of research methods and the poor attention to research design indicates a need for a changed set of research methods. We propose more critical case studies and method diversification through theory triangulation.

     

    Additionally, among disparate discourses we highlight several focusing on standardization which are likely to contain relevant findings. This suggests that open communities employed in the context of (pre-)standardization could be especially important in furthering the targeted discourse.

  • 46.
    Asplund, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Törngren, Martin
    Biehl, Matthias
    El-khoury, Jad
    Frede, Daniel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Tool Integration, from Tool to Tool Chain with ISO 262622012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of innovative power sources in future cars has long-ranging implications on vehicle safety.  We studied these implications in the context of the guidance on software tool qualification in the then current ISO 26262 draft, when building an urban concept vehicle to participate in the 2011 Shell Eco-Marathon. While the guidance on tool qualification is detailed, the guidance in regard to tools integrated into tool chains is limited. It only points out that the environment that tools execute in needs to be taken into consideration.

    In this paper we clarify the implications of tool chains on tool qualification in the context of ISO 26262 by focusing on answering two questions; first, are there parts of the development environment related to tool integration that are likely to fall outside of tool qualification efforts as currently defined by ISO 26262; secondly, can we define if, and -if so- how, tool integration is affected by ensuring functional safety.

    We conclude by identifying two areas related to tool integration that are likely to fall outside the tool qualification efforts (data integrity and process logic) and describing how different constraints imposed by ISO 26262 in relation to tool qualification conflict when tool integration is improved (improvements aimed at supporting completeness, consistency and the safety lifecycle vs. tool qualification cost).

    We are able to make additional conclusions in relation to the State of the Art discussion on software tool qualification according to ISO 26262. First, reference tool chains and guidelines on which characteristics tool qualification should ensure for tool chains are needed to complement ISO 26262. Secondly, guidance on tool integration can be found in the completeness characteristic, the consistency characteristic and the ISO 26262 safety lifecycle process. Finally, qualification efforts should ideally target tool chains rather than individual tools.

  • 47.
    Asplund, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Törngren, Martin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Hawkins, Richard
    University of York.
    McDermid, John A.
    University of York.
    The Need for a Confidence View of CPS Support Environments (Fast Abstract)2015In: Proceedings of HASE 2015, The 16th IEEE International Symposium on High Assurance Systems Engineering, IEEE Computer Society, 2015, 273-274 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multi-View Modelling Integration Frameworks (MVMIFs) may help mitigate complexity associated with the development of CPS, but may also have implications on safety. Safety-related standards do not provide guidance to mitigate this problem. We therefore suggest that MVMIFs are extended with a confidence view to support the creation of an assurance case that covers issues related to risks in the support environment.

  • 48.
    Asplund, Lars
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Lundqvist, Kristina
    Mälardalen University, School of Innovation, Design and Engineering.
    Safety Critical Systems Based on Formal Models2000In: ACM SIGAda Letters, ISSN 1094-3641, Vol. XX, no 4, 32-39 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Ravenscar profile for high integrity systems using Ada 95 is well defined in all real-time aspects. The complexity of the run-time system has been reduced to allow full utilization of formal methods for applications using the Ravenscar profile. In the Mana project a tool set is being developed including a formal model of a Ravenscar compliant run-time system, a gnat compatible run-time system, and an ASIS based tool to allow for the verification of a system including both COTS and code that is reused.

  • 49.
    Athalye, Akshay
    et al.
    Stony Brook University, USA.
    Savic, Vladimir
    Technical University of Madrid, Spain.
    Bolic, Miodrag
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Djuric, Petar M.
    Stony Brook University, USA.
    A Radio Frequency Identification System for accurate indoor localization2011In: Proc. of IEEE Intl. Conf. on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP), 2011, 1777-1780 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a novel Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) system for accurate indoor localization. The system is composed of a standard Ultra High Frequency (UHF), ISO-18006C compliant RFID reader, a large set of standard passive RFID tags whose locations are known, and a newly developed tag-like RFID component that is attached to the items that need to be localized. The new semi-passive component, referred to as sensatag (sense-a-tag), has a dual functionality wherein it can sense the communication between the reader and standard tags which are in its proximity, and also communicate with the reader like standard tags using backscatter modulation. Based on the information conveyed by the sensatags to the reader, localization algorithms based on binary sensor principles can be developed. We present results from real measurements that show the accuracy of the proposed system.

  • 50.
    Athalye, Akshay
    et al.
    Stony Brook University, USA.
    Savic, Vladimir
    Signal Processing Application Group, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Bolic, Miodrag
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Djuric, Petar M.
    Stony Brook University, USA.
    Novel Semi-Passive RFID System for Indoor Localization2013In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 13, no 2, 528-537 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present a novel semi-passive radio-frequency identification (RFID) system for accurate indoor localization. The system is composed of a standard ultra high frequency (UHF) ISO-18000-6C compliant RFID reader, a set of standard passive RFID tags whose locations are known, and a newly developed tag-like RFID component, which is attached to the items that need to be localized. The new semi-passive component, referred to as sensatag (sense-a-tag), has a dual functionality: it can sense and decode communication between the reader and standard tags in its proximity, and can communicate with the reader like standard tags using backscatter modulation. Based on the information conveyed by the sensatags to the reader, localization algorithms based on binary sensor principles can be developed. We conduct a number of experiments in a laboratory to quantify the performance of our system, including two real applications, one finding the exact placement of items on shelves, and the other estimating the direction of item movement.

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