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Mobility is the Message: Experiments with Mobile Media Sharing
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. (Mobile Life Centre)
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis explores new mobile media sharing applications by building, deploying, and studying their use. While we share media in many different ways both on the web and on mobile phones, there are few ways of sharing media with people physically near us. Studied were three designed and built systems: Push!Music, Columbus, and Portrait Catalog, as well as a fourth commercially available system – Foursquare. This thesis offers four contributions: First, it explores the design space of co-present media sharing of four test systems. Second, through user studies of these systems it reports on how these come to be used. Third, it explores new ways of conducting trials as the technical mobile landscape has changed. Last, we look at how the technical solutions demonstrate different lines of thinking from how similar solutions might look today.

Through a Human-Computer Interaction methodology of design, build, and study, we look at systems through the eyes of embodied interaction and examine how the systems come to be in use. Using Goffman’s understanding of social order, we see how these mobile media sharing systems allow people to actively present themselves through these media. In turn, using McLuhan’s way of understanding media, we reflect on how these new systems enable a new type of medium distinct from the web centric media, and how this relates directly to mobility.

While media sharing is something that takes place everywhere in western society, it is still tied to the way media is shared through computers. Although often mobile, they do not consider the mobile settings. The systems in this thesis treat mobility as an opportunity for design. It is still left to see how this mobile media sharing will come to present itself in people’s everyday life, and when it does, how we will come to understand it and how it will transform society as a medium distinct from those before. This thesis gives a glimpse at what this future will look like.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University , 2013. , 101 p.
Series
Report Series / Department of Computer & Systems Sciences, ISSN 1101-8526 ; 13-002SICS dissertation series, ISSN 1101-1335 ; 59
Keyword [en]
mobile, media, sharing, design, studies, mobility, trials, foursquare, music sharing, co-present interaction, goffman, ubicomp, hci, mobile hci
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Man-Machine-Interaction (MMI)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-87218ISBN: 978-91-7447-643-9 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-87218DiVA: diva2:602247
Public defence
2013-03-11, sal C, Electrum, Isafjordsgatan 20-26, Kista, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Projects
Mobile Life Centre
Note

At the  time of doctoral defense, the following paper was unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 4: Submitted.

Available from: 2013-02-14 Created: 2013-01-29 Last updated: 2013-02-14Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Facilitating Mobile Music Sharing and Social Interaction with Push!Music
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Facilitating Mobile Music Sharing and Social Interaction with Push!Music
2007 (English)In: Proceedings of the 40th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, IEEE Computer Society Washington , 2007, 87- p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Push!Music is a novel mobile music listening and sharing system, where users automatically receive songs that have autonomously recommended themselves from nearby players depending on similar listening behaviour and music history. Push!Music also enables users to wirelessly send songs between each other as personal recommendations. We conducted a two-week preliminary user study of Push!Music, where a group of five friends used the application in their everyday life. We learned for example that the shared music in Push!Music became a start for social interaction and that received songs in general were highly appreciated and could be looked upon as 'treats'.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE Computer Society Washington, 2007
National Category
Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-25704 (URN)10.1109/HICSS.2007.225 (DOI)0-7695-2755-8 (ISBN)
Conference
HICSS '07
Available from: 2009-02-04 Created: 2009-01-26 Last updated: 2013-02-01Bibliographically approved
2. Gifts from friends and strangers: A study of mobile music sharing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gifts from friends and strangers: A study of mobile music sharing
2007 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2007 Tenth European Conference onComputer-Supported Cooperative Work / [ed] Liam Bannon et al., London: Springer , 2007, 311-330 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Mobile technology has turned the traditionally collective activity of enjoying music into an often private one. New technologies such as wireless ad hoc networks have the potential to re-connect listeners who are now separated by headphones. We report on a field study of Push!Music,a novel mobile music sharing system. Push!Music allows both manual and automatic sharing of music between users through ad hoc wireless networking, and also provides a social awareness of other users nearby. The system was used by 13 subjects for three weeks. In post-study interviews, we identified four categories of results: social awareness, sharing music with friends, sharing music with strangers, andsharing automatically. Based on this, we present implications for design that can be applied not only to mobile music sharing systems, but to mobile media sharing in general: Allow division into active and passive use; enhance the awareness of who, where and when; support reciprocity; and finally, support identity and impression management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Springer, 2007
National Category
Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-25705 (URN)10.1007/978-1-84800-031-5_17 (DOI)
Conference
ECSCW 2007: 10th European Conference on Computer-Supported Collaborative Work, 24-28 Sept 2007, Limerick, Ireland
Available from: 2009-02-04 Created: 2009-01-26 Last updated: 2013-02-01Bibliographically approved
3. Mobile exploration of geotagged photographs
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mobile exploration of geotagged photographs
2011 (English)In: Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, ISSN 1617-4917, Vol. 15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Columbus is a mobile application that lets users explore their surroundings through geotagged photographs, presented to them at the location they were taken. By moving around the physical world, the user unlocks photographs and gets to see and experience them in unison with their location. During two consecutive field trials, we investigated how the application was used and experienced and how photographs and locations are explored together. We found that previous experience with the surroundings people was exploring affected how they experienced the localized content. We report on the system’s design and implementation, the trials as well as resulting insights that can be used by other developers of locative media applications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Springer Verlag, 2011
Keyword
Location – Photographs – Geotagging – Locative media
National Category
Information Systems
Research subject
Man-Machine-Interaction (MMI)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-67158 (URN)10.1007/s00779-011-0433-x (DOI)
Available from: 2011-12-26 Created: 2011-12-26 Last updated: 2013-02-01Bibliographically approved
4. Teens Using Portrait Catalog: An Evaluation Of a Mobile Photo Sharing System
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teens Using Portrait Catalog: An Evaluation Of a Mobile Photo Sharing System
(English)In: International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction, ISSN 1942-390X, E-ISSN 1942-3918Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

In this paper we describe a mobile photo sharing system and a mass scale evaluation at a local youth festival. The system prevents pictures received from being forwarded and aims at adding meaning to photos shared through such a system making them collectable. The study setup was at a large youth festival where 400 teenagers had their photo taken and given the opportunity to have the application installed on their own phones. Although we achieved a large user base, the actual use was never triggered to reach critical mass. We report on the experience of the users, and also report on how teenagers in our study mostly share photos by looking at each other’s phone screens.

Keyword
Media sharing, mobile systems
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Computer Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-87214 (URN)
Available from: 2013-01-29 Created: 2013-01-29 Last updated: 2017-06-01Bibliographically approved
5. Performing a Check-in: Emerging Practices, Norms and ‘Conflicts’ in Location-Sharing Using Foursquare.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Performing a Check-in: Emerging Practices, Norms and ‘Conflicts’ in Location-Sharing Using Foursquare.
2011 (English)In: Proceedings of the 13th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services, Stockholm, Sweden: ACM , 2011Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Location-sharing services have a long history in research, but have only recently become available for consumers. Most popular commercial location-sharing services differ from previous research efforts in important ways: they use manual ‘check-ins’ to pair user location with semantically named venues rather than tracking; venues are visible to all users; location is shared with a potentially very large audience; and they employ incentives. By analysis of 20 in- depth interviews with foursquare users and 47 survey responses, we gained insight into emerging social practices surrounding location-sharing. We see a shift from privacy issues and data deluge, to more performative considerations in sharing one’s location. We discuss performance aspects enabled by check-ins to public venues, and show emergent, but sometimes conflicting norms (not) to check-in.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm, Sweden: ACM, 2011
Keyword
Location-sharing, check-ins, foursquare, performance
National Category
Information Systems
Research subject
Man-Machine-Interaction (MMI)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-67173 (URN)978-1-4503-0541-9 (ISBN)
Conference
Mobile HCI 2011, Stockholm, Sweden, August 30 - September 2, 2011.
Available from: 2011-12-26 Created: 2011-12-26 Last updated: 2013-02-01Bibliographically approved
6. Guest editorial Preface on Special Issue: An Introduction to Research in the Large
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Guest editorial Preface on Special Issue: An Introduction to Research in the Large
2011 (English)In: International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction, ISSN 1942-390X, no Special issueArticle, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Distribution of mobile applications has been greatly simplified by mobile app stores and markets. Both lone developers and large research and development teams can now relatively easily reach wide audiences. In addition, people’s mobile phones can now run advanced applications and are equipped with sensors that used to be available only in custom research hardware. This provides researchers with a huge opportunity to gather research data from a large public. Evaluation and research methods have to be adapted to this new context. However, an overview of successful strategies and ways to overcome the methodological challenges inherent to wide deployment in a research context is not yet available. A workshop was organized on this topic and this special issue to help address these topics. This introduction provides an overview of strategies and opportunities in ‘research in the large’, while providing an introduction to challenges in ethics and validity as well.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Aston University, UK, 2011
Keyword
research in the large, ubiquitous computing, mobile research, research methods
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Computer Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-87217 (URN)
Available from: 2013-01-30 Created: 2013-01-29 Last updated: 2013-02-01Bibliographically approved

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