Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Genomic Regions Associated With Interspecies Communication in Dogs Contain Genes Related to Human Social Disorders
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2329-2635
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3297-1130
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Show others and affiliations
2016 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, 33439Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Unlike their wolf ancestors, dogs have unique social skills for communicating and cooperating with humans. Previously, significant heritabilities for human-directed social behaviors have been found in laboratory beagles. Here, a Genome-Wide Association Study identified two genomic regions associated with dog's human-directed social behaviors. We recorded the propensity of laboratory beagles, bred, kept and handled under standardized conditions, to initiate physical interactions with a human during an unsolvable problem-task, and 190 individuals were genotyped with an HD Canine SNP-chip. One genetic marker on chromosome 26 within the SEZ6L gene was significantly associated with time spent close to, and in physical contact with, the human. Two suggestive markers on chromosome 26, located within the ARVCF gene, were also associated with human contact seeking. Strikingly, four additional genes present in the same linkage blocks affect social abilities in humans, e.g., SEZ6L has been associated with autism and COMT affects aggression in adolescents with ADHD. This is, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide study presenting candidate genomic regions for dog sociability and inter-species communication. These results advance our understanding of dog domestication and raise the use of the dog as a novel model system for human social disorders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2016. Vol. 6, 33439
National Category
Genetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-131644DOI: 10.1038/srep33439ISI: 000384172800001PubMedID: 27685260OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-131644DiVA: diva2:998790
Note

Funding agencies: European Research Council (ERC) [322206]; Formas

Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-09-30 Last updated: 2016-10-26Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(807 kB)15 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 807 kBChecksum SHA-512
2e80304a44433aeb02a87e819e741bb16ee1c6a3b97181b5eacf649aef64ab463f2cec2a16a64022cd60c1149e0656ca3ae749be6fe7c3fcdf29236c4d375ae4
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Persson, MiaWright, DominicRoth, LinaBatakis, PetrosJensen, Per
By organisation
BiologyFaculty of Science & Engineering
In the same journal
Scientific Reports
Genetics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 15 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 46 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link