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Seasonal groundwater turnover
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Architecture and Water.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7144-9778
2006 (English)In: Nordic Hydrology, ISSN 0029-1277, E-ISSN 1996-9694, Vol. 37, no 1, 31-39 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Seasonal air temperature variations and corresponding changes in groundwater temperature cause convective movements in groundwater similar to the seasonal turnover in lakes. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate the natural conditions for thermally driven groundwater convection to take place. Thermally driven convection could be triggered by a horizontal groundwater flow, Convection then starts at a considerably lower Rayleigh number (Ra) than the general critical Rayleigh number (Ra assuming that 10 degrees C groundwater is cooled to 4 degrees C, i.e. heated from below convection in porous media, This study supports the hypothesis that seasonal temperature variations, under certain conditions, initiate and drive thermal convection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 37, no 1, 31-39 p.
National Category
Water Engineering
Research subject
Water Resources Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-15162DOI: 10.2166/nh.2005.028Local ID: ea4a3600-9207-11db-8975-000ea68e967bOAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-15162DiVA: diva2:988135
Note
Validerad; 2006; 20061006 (pafi)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Secondary currents in groundwater
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Secondary currents in groundwater
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The thesis concerns the small vertical water movements created by thermal convection and the Coriolis force acting on groundwater flows. These small flows are of importance to vertical transports of temperature, nutrients and contaminants that would not be spread in the way they are. The first part analyzes thermally driven, seasonal groundwater convection by numerical simulation. The second part shows that the Coriolis force also induces secondary currents in groundwater flow through different vertical permeability distributions. Density driven convection occurs during the autumn in southern Sweden when the ambient air temperature cools the mean groundwater temperature from about 10ºC. When the shallow groundwater is cooled by the ambient air its increased density makes this water sink, slowly increasing in temperature, while pressing the warmer water upwards creating a convection cell. The process is ongoing as long as there is a thermal gradient between ground surface and the groundwater. Under favorable conditions convection can reach a depth of 6m. Such density-driven water movements occur most easily in more permeable soil. In northern Sweden, the situation is reversed, since the mean groundwater temperature is below 4ºC, at which water is at its density maximum. So, in springtime when the uppermost groundwater is heated to 4ºC by the warmer air the convection process starts. Here, the sinking groundwater does not reach the same depth, less than one meter. The Coriolis force has been considered too small to have any effect on groundwater flow, though its importance in meteorology and oceanography is well established. These theories have been applied using numerical simulations of groundwater flow. The numerical model has been validated by simulating some earlier studies of Coriolis forces in fluids. Furthermore the model has been extended to include porous media. It has been shown that secondary currents occur in nonlinear vertical permeability distributions. For simulations of constant and linear distributions no secondary currents have been seen. The development is more pronounced in confined aquifers. The structure of the bottom of the aquifer  affects  how the secondary currents arise. It was shown that both temperature gradients and the Coriolis force form secondary currents in groundwater and a general conclusion is that groundwater flow is more complex than previously assumed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Luleå University of Technology, 2017. 70 p.
Series
Doctoral thesis / Luleå University of Technology 1 jan 1997 → …, ISSN 1402-1544
Keyword
Groundwater
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology, Water Resources
Research subject
Water Resources Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-66411 (URN)978-91-7790-006-1 (ISBN)978-91-7790-007-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-12-15, F1031, Luleå, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-11-14 Created: 2017-11-11 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved

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