Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Restoring the Garden of Eden, Iraq
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6790-2653
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1365-8552
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering, Mining and Geotechnical Engineering.
2012 (English)In: Journal of Earth Sciences and Geotechnical Engineering, ISSN 1792-9040, E-ISSN 1792-9660, Vol. 2, no 1, 53-88 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Iraqi marsh lands, which are known as the Garden of Eden, cover an area about 15-20 103. km2 in the lower part of the Mesopotamian basin where the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers flow. The area had played a prominent part in the history of man kind and was inhabited since the dawn of civilization. The area was considered among the largest wetlands in the world and the greatest in west Asia. Saddam regime began to drain the marsh lands for military and political reasons. Accordingly, at 2000 less than 10% of the marshes remained. The consequences were that most of the marsh dwellers left their places and some animals and plants are eradicated now. After the fall of Saddam regime in 2003, the process of restoration and rehabilitation of Iraqi marshes started. There are number of difficulties encountered in the process. Some of them are land use changes, climatic variations and changes, soil and water salinity as well as ecological fragmentation where many species were affected as well as the marsh dwellers.In this research we would like to explore the possibilities of restoring the Iraqi marshes. It is believed that 70- 75% of the original areas of the marshes can be restored. This implies that 13 km3 water should be available to achieve this goal keeping the water quality as it is. To evaluate the water quality in the marshes, 154 samples were collected at 48 stations during summer, spring and winter. All the results indicate that the water quality was bad. To improve the water quality, then 18.86 km3 of water is required. This requires plenty of efforts and international cooperation to overcome the existing obstacles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 2, no 1, 53-88 p.
Keyword [en]
Earth sciences - Atmosphere and hydrosphere sciences
Keyword [sv]
Geovetenskap - Atmosfärs- och hydrosfärsvetenskap
National Category
Geotechnical Engineering
Research subject
Soil Mechanics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-14099Local ID: d69bacd8-fb5d-4339-aaa3-887751f21a41OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-14099DiVA: diva2:987053
Note
Validerad; 2012; 20120607 (nadhir)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(3539 kB)393 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 3539 kBChecksum SHA-512
350124f4a9084aa59e3c559199b067cdd2f3f46ad28e219a1525caaf1692cf14e6442c78a7035d39c5c4b63c55b2309281ca3f1afcfe5567dc4630ac9a3bc9d3
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

http://www.scienpress.com/Upload/GEO/Vol%202_1_4.pdf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Al-Ansari, NadhirKnutsson, SvenAli, Ammar
By organisation
Mining and Geotechnical Engineering
In the same journal
Journal of Earth Sciences and Geotechnical Engineering
Geotechnical Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar