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Peers, parents and phones: Swedish adolescents and health promotion
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3876-7202
Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Sciences, Health and Rehab.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6975-8344
2012 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 7, 17726Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many unhealthy behaviors are created during adolescence and follow the individual into adulthood. In addition, health behaviors often occur in clusters as those who are inactive are more likely to eat unhealthy food and smoke. This makes the early foundation of healthy behaviors vital. The aim was to describe and develop an understanding of adolescents' awareness and experiences concerning health promotion. Data was collected using focus groups with a total of 28 seventh graders and was analysed with latent qualitative content analysis. One main theme was identified; being competent, ambivalent and creative at the same time. The following three subthemes also emerged: being a digital native for better and for worse, knowing what is healthy, and sometimes doing it, and considering change and having ideas of how change could be supported. The main theme elucidates how the majority of students were informed and able but they did not always prioritize their health. The concept of health promotion relies upon the engagement of the individual; however, although the students had clear ideas about how they would like to change their own behaviors, they felt a need for support. Interestingly, the students were able to make several suggestions about the kind of support that would make a difference to their adoption to more healthy modes of living. They suggested information and communication technology (ICT), for example encouraging text messages (SMS), and social support, for example parents setting rules and peers inspiring them to adhere to a healthy behavior. The knowledge gained from this study echoes our view of inclusion and this could be helpful for those who encounter the challenge of promoting health among adolescents

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 7, 17726
National Category
Physiotherapy Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Physiotherapy; Health Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-10730DOI: 10.3402/qhw.v7i0.17726Local ID: 993719e6-4f9e-4069-9479-b9f6d901b527OAI: oai:DiVA.org:ltu-10730DiVA: diva2:983676
Projects
ArctiChildren InNet
Note

Validerad; 2012; 20120808 (andbra)

Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved

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Lindqvist, Anna-KarinKostenius, CatrineGard, Gunvor

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