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The fallacies of concurrent climate policy efforts
LuleƄ University of Technology, Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences, Social Sciences.
2010 (English)In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 39, no 3, 211-222 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate policy has assumed an extreme degree of urgency in the international debate in recent years. This article begins by taking a critical look at the scientific underpinnings of the efforts to stabilize the climate. It points to several serious question marks on the purported relationship between greenhouse gas emissions and global warming, and expresses distrust about claims of impending catastrophes related to rising sea levels, hurricanes, and spread of infectious disease. It then reviews the concurrent climate policy efforts and concludes that they are incoherent, misguided and unduly costly, and that they have so far had no perceptible impact on anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The exceedingly ambitious policy plans currently under preparation suffer from similar fallacies. For these reasons, but also because of the remaining scientific doubts and the exorbitant costs that have to be incurred, skepticism is expressed about the preparedness to implement the climate policy plans currently on the table

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 39, no 3, 211-222 p.
Research subject
URN: urn:nbn:se:ltu:diva-3576DOI: 10.1007/s13280-010-0029-0Local ID: 166f3ae0-7586-11df-ab16-000ea68e967bOAI: diva2:976434
Validerad; 2010; 20100611 (ysko)Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29Bibliographically approved

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