Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The use of music to feel happy and safe exemplified by the case of Debbie, a First Nations teenager diagnosed with ASD
Karlstad University, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (starting 2013), Department of Educational Studies (from 2013).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9637-5338
2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Abstract

This presentation introduces a case study that aims to show how music can be used to improve the quality of life for individuals diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

Background

There is extensive research on music interventions for individuals with ASD but there is a lack on research within Indigenous context. This presentation focuses on one of five cases, a teen called Debbie, from a research project on the meaning of music for First Nations children in British Columbia, Canada, diagnosed with ASD.

Methodology

Ethnographic field studies strongly influenced by Indigenous research methodologies were conducted in 2013 and 2014. The material consists of transcribed interviews, observations, and videotaped observations and music interventions.

Ethical aspects

This research project was approved by the ethical committee at the University of Eastern Finland. Informed consent was given by all who participated in the study and consent was negotiated throughout the research process. All names were changed and tribal affiliation omitted.

Results

Debbie uses music in all aspects of her life to feel happy and safe. She listens to it, watches videos, sings and dances whenever possible. At home, in school and at the after school club, music is a big part of her structure. Contemporary pop and dance music has been her preference until she recently made and played an Aboriginal drum.

Closing remarks

There is a scarcity of research on music and autism within Indigenous context. Hopefully, this case can inspire to future research and influence support systems and interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016.
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-46225OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-46225DiVA, id: diva2:972457
Conference
XI Autism Europe International Congress
Funder
The Kempe FoundationsLars Hierta Memorial FoundationHelge Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse Available from: 2016-09-21 Created: 2016-09-21 Last updated: 2019-09-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(38 kB)3 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 38 kBChecksum SHA-512
0c54936f8c090a64c27af41fcec1df04d0922f6de953df5338d54db5262406048e3e1bcf9977d7796dd04180be90eb9ace1ff1a965c003e515b7aad95dc7c591
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lindblom, Anne
By organisation
Department of Educational Studies (from 2013)
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 3 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 122 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf