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Recurrent Sleep Fragmentation Induces Insulin and Neuroprotective Mechanisms in Middle-Aged Flies
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology.
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2016 (English)In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, ISSN 1663-4365, E-ISSN 1663-4365, Vol. 8, 180Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lack of quality sleep increases central nervous system oxidative stress and impairs removal of neurotoxic soluble metabolites from brain parenchyma. During aging poor sleep quality, caused by sleep fragmentation, increases central nervous system cellular stress. Currently, it is not known how organisms offset age-related cytotoxic metabolite increases in order to safeguard neuronal survival. Furthermore, it is not understood how age and sleep fragmentation interact to affect oxidative stress protection pathways. We demonstrate sleep fragmentation increases systems that protect against oxidative damage and neuroprotective endoplasmic reticulum molecular chaperones, as well as neuronal insulin and dopaminergic expression in middle-aged Drosophila males. Interestingly, even after sleep recovery the expression of these genes was still upregulated in middle-aged flies. Finally, sleep fragmentation generates higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in middle-aged flies and after sleep recovery these levels remain significantly higher than in young flies. The fact that neuroprotective pathways remain upregulated in middle-aged flies beyond sleep fragmentation suggests it might represent a strong stressor for the brain during later life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 8, 180
Keyword [en]
sleep, metabolism, insulin, glucagon, dopamine, molecular chaperone, Nrf2
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-302683DOI: 10.3389/fnagi.2016.00180ISI: 000380785700001PubMedID: 27531979OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-302683DiVA: diva2:970800
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilNovo NordiskThe Swedish Brain FoundationCarl Tryggers foundation Stiftelsen Olle Engkvist ByggmästareLars Hierta Memorial Foundation
Available from: 2016-09-14 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2016-09-14Bibliographically approved

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Williams, Michael J.Perland, EmelieEriksson, Mikaela M.Laan, LooraFrediksson, RobertBenedict, ChristianSchiöth, Helgi B.
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