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The Ethics of CRISPR: Using Human Germline Gene Modification to Prevent Genetic Disease
Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Centre for Applied Ethics.
2016 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

With the discovery and development of CRISPR, the technology that might allow us to modify the human germline is at our fingertips, and, consequently, serious practical and ethical consideration is warranted. In the following paper, I examine the ethics of using CRISPR in this way and argue that modifying the human germline for the purpose of preventing serious genetic disease is, in principle, ethically acceptable and ought to be allowed. I present several arguments to this effect including arguments that rely on the principles of beneficence and autonomy. I also examine the larger societal implications of human germline modification. I then respond to six of the most prominent objections that have been raised against CRISPR and germline gene modification before concluding with a brief discussion of the biggest challenge that we face as we move forward with CRISPR, that of limiting the use of this promising and incredibly versatile technology. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. , 35 p.
Keyword [en]
CRISPR, Human Germline, Gene Modification, Ethics, Genetic Disease
National Category
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129820ISRN: LIU-CTE-AE-EX--16/02--SEOAI: diva2:944110
Subject / course
Master in Applied Ethics
Available from: 2016-06-29 Created: 2016-06-28 Last updated: 2016-06-29Bibliographically approved

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Yeager, Austen
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