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Does the gender composition in couplesmatter for the division of labor after childbirth?
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
2016 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this paper I compare the effect of entering parenthood on the spousal income gaps inlesbian and heterosexual couples using Swedish population wide register data. Comparingcouples with similar pre-childbirth income gaps, a difference-in-differences strategyis used to estimate the impact of the gender composition of the couple on the spousalincome gap after childbirth. The results indicate that the gender composition of the coupledoes matter for the division of labor after having children. Five years after childbirththe income gap is smaller in lesbian than in heterosexual couples also when comparingcouples with the same pre-parenthood income gap. Heterosexual couples’ division of laborseems to be influenced by traditional gender norms, regardless of their pre-childbirthincome gap. In lesbian couples the partners’ relative earnings before parenthood and aprinciple about fairness may be more important, as well as the partners’ preferences forgiving birth as the birth giving partner typically spends more time on parental leave.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. , 62 p.
Working paper / Department of Economics, Uppsala University (Online), ISSN 1653-6975 ; 2016:8
Keyword [en]
economics of gender; division of labor; labor supply; same-sex couples; transition to parenthood
National Category
Research subject
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-297405OAI: diva2:941724
Available from: 2016-06-22 Created: 2016-06-22 Last updated: 2016-06-23Bibliographically approved

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