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A comparative study of translation strategies applied in dealing with role languages.: A translation analysis of the video game Final Fantasy XIV
Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
2016 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Localisation is the process of taking a product and adapting it to fit the culture in question.

This usually involves making it both linguistically and culturally appropriate for the target audience. While there are many areas in video game translations where localisation holds a factor, this study will focus on localisation changes in the personalities of fictional characters between the original Japanese version and the English localised version of the video game Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn and its expansion Heavensward for PC, PS3 and PS4. With this in mind, specific examples are examined using Satoshi Kinsui's work on yakuwarigo, role language as the main framework for this study.

Five non-playable characters were profiled and had each of their dialogues transcribed for a

comparative analysis. This included the original Japanese text, the officially localised English text and a translation of the original Japanese text done by myself. Each character were also given a short summary and a reasoned speculation on why these localisation changes might have occurred.

The result shows that there were instances where some translations had been deliberately

adjusted to ensure that the content did not cause any problematic issues to players overseas. This could be reasoned out that some of the Japanese role languages displayed by characters in this game could potentially cause dispute among the western audience. In conclusion, the study shows that localisation can be a difficult process that not only requires a translator's knowledge of the source and target language, but also display some creativity in writing ability to ensure that players will have a comparable experience without causing a rift in the fanbase.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016.
Keyword [en]
Localisation, role language, Japanese, English, translation studies, video games.
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Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-21697OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-21697DiVA: diva2:936746
Available from: 2016-06-14 Created: 2016-06-14

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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Language
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  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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