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Economic decline and residential segregation: a Swedish study with focus on Malmö
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Housing and Urban Research. Delft Univ Technol, Fac Architecture & Built Environm, OTB Res Built Environm, Delft, Netherlands.
2016 (English)In: Urban geography, ISSN 0272-3638, E-ISSN 1938-2847, Vol. 37, no 5, 748-768 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Economic crises are often associated with increasing levels of income segregation and income polarization. Poor neighborhoods generally hit more severely, with unemployment levels increasing and income levels dropping more than in better-off neighborhoods. In this article, we study the correlation between economic recession and income segregation in Malmö, Sweden, with focus on development in the regions' poorest neighborhoods. We compare and contrast these areas' development during a period of economic crisis (1990–1995) with development during a period characterized by relative economic stability. Our findings  suggest that (1) income segregation and income polarization indeed increased during the period of economic crisis; (2) neighborhoods that were already poor before the crisis fared worse than the region in general; and (3) this development was due to both in situ changes and to residential sorting, where the differences in income and employment status between people moving into a neighborhood, those moving out, and those who remained in place were greater during the period of recession compared to the more stable period.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 37, no 5, 748-768 p.
Keyword [en]
Economic crisis; segregation; selective migration; Sweden; Malmö
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-288003DOI: 10.1080/02723638.2015.1133993ISI: 000379762800007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-288003DiVA: diva2:923712
Funder
EU, European Research Council, 615159
Available from: 2016-04-27 Created: 2016-04-27 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved

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Andersson, RogerHedman, Lina

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