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Andes Hantavirus-Infection of a 3D Human Lung Tissue Model Reveals a Late Peak in Progeny Virus Production Followed by Increased Levels of Proinflammatory Cytokines and VEGF-A
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
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2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 2, article id e0149354Article in journal (Refereed) Published
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Abstract [en]

Andes virus (ANDV) causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), a severe acute disease with a 40% case fatality rate. Humans are infected via inhalation, and the lungs are severely affected during HPS, but little is known regarding the effects of ANDV-infection of the lung. Using a 3-dimensional air-exposed organotypic human lung tissue model, we analyzed progeny virus production and cytokine-responses after ANDV-infection. After a 7-10 day period of low progeny virus production, a sudden peak in progeny virus levels was observed during approximately one week. This peak in ANDV-production coincided in time with activation of innate immune responses, as shown by induction of type I and III interferons and ISG56. After the peak in ANDV production a low, but stable, level of ANDV progeny was observed until 39 days after infection. Compared to uninfected models, ANDV caused long-term elevated levels of eotaxin-1, IL-6, IL-8, IP-10, and VEGF-A that peaked 20-25 days after infection, i.e., after the observed peak in progeny virus production. Notably, eotaxin-1 was only detected in supernatants from infected models. In conclusion, these findings suggest that ANDV replication in lung tissue elicits a late proinflammatory immune response with possible long-term effects on the local lung cytokine milieu. The change from an innate to a proinflammatory response might be important for the transition from initial asymptomatic infection to severe clinical disease, HPS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 11, no 2, article id e0149354
Keyword [en]
Andes virus, hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, HPS
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Microbiology in the medical area
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URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-118792DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0149354ISI: 000371163000009PubMedID: 26907493OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-118792DiVA, id: diva2:918449
Available from: 2016-04-11 Created: 2016-04-04 Last updated: 2018-03-16Bibliographically approved

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