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How to support patients who are crying in palliative home care: an interview study from the nurses' perspective.
Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
2016 (English)In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, ISSN 1463-4236, E-ISSN 1477-1128, Vol. 17, no 5, 479-488 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim The aim of this study was to explore how nurses can support patients who are crying in a palliative home care context.

BACKGROUND: In palliative care the nurse has a central role in the team whose duty it is to create a sense of security and trust, as well as to give comfort and support the patients. The nurse's responsibility is to identify different needs of the patients for support and develop a relationship with them. Patients may express their pain, anxiety, fear and suffering by crying. No studies have been found which focus on how nurses can support patients who are crying in different ways and crying for different reasons.

METHODS: A qualitative explorative study was performed. Semi-structured interviews were held with eight nurses aged 32-63 years (Median 40) working in Swedish palliative home care. The data were analysed using Qualitative Content analysis. Findings It was reported that the nurse should meet and confirm the patient during different types of crying episodes and should also be able to alternate between being close and physically touching the in such close contact with the patients, the nurse can provide emotional support by showing empathy, merely being present and letting the patients cry as much as they want. When the crying finally stops, the nurse can support the person by speaking with them, showing sensitivity, humility and respect for the patient's wishes. A few examples of the patients' need for information or practical support emerged. The nurse can emotionally support the person who is crying by just being present, confirming, showing empathy, offering a chance to talk and showing respect for their individual needs and the different ways they may cry.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2016. Vol. 17, no 5, 479-488 p.
Keyword [en]
crying; home care services; interview; nurses; nursing care; palliative care; qualitative research; social support; terminal care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126433DOI: 10.1017/S1463423616000037ISI: 000389211700006PubMedID: 26932445OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-126433DiVA: diva2:914563
Available from: 2016-03-24 Created: 2016-03-24 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

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