Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Divided by a common language: A comparative study of preferences for, and use of, American and British English vocabulary among students in Swedish upper secondary and tertiary education
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Linnaeus University.
2016 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

This comparative study aims to discover and demonstrate the potential division in preferences for, and use of, AmE and BrE vocabulary by examining the possible influence of variety shift, motivation, gender, and language contact among 181 EFL students in one upper secondary school and one university in Sweden. Accordingly, the material, a questionnaire, was distributed to probe the preferences and potential inclination factors through solicitation of background information and personal attitudes towards English. Additionally, through a selection process within the questionnaire, to determine the division in actual variety use, the respondents chose between 30 variety-dependent synonyms randomly divided into two separate columns. The results demonstrate a self-reported preference for AmE among upper secondary students, which seems to derive from its high frequency of use, and a preference for BrE among students in tertiary education, due to the more appealing sound of pronunciation and the status which it is believed to signal. Additionally, intrinsic motivation is shown to be more frequent among students who prefer BrE. The differences in variety use are, despite some minor connection to variety shift, essentially identical regardless of variety preference, motivation, EFL level and student gender, with AmE being used most frequently. However, none of the respondents used exclusively one variety without alternating between the two in at least one instance, but the extent of inclination seemed to depend on the variety with which one had had the longest contact.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. , 27 p.
Keyword [en]
American English, British English, EFL, variety preference, variety use
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-50400OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-50400DiVA: diva2:910356
Subject / course
English
Educational program
Teacher Education Programme for Upper Secondary School, 300/330 credits
Presentation
2016-02-25, Platon, Universitetsplatsen 1, Växjö, 13:15 (English)
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2016-06-01 Created: 2016-03-08 Last updated: 2016-06-01Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(913 kB)87 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 913 kBChecksum SHA-512
7571b00ccd7aabad984d752087bbdcb059be795d9296972eeaa3c5685bbe6ba348c4288ba2fbddee35e73b034224384149e3a2f5ecce756888f821cc301a4b97
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
Department of Languages
General Language Studies and Linguistics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 87 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 227 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf