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Understanding the process of establishing a food and nutrition policy: the case of Slovenia
Unit for Public Health Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Health, Nutrition and Management, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
Department of Political Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Unit for Public Health Nutrition, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Health, Nutrition and Management, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Oslo, Norway. (Agneta Yngve)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7165-279X
2012 (English)In: Health Policy, ISSN 0168-8510, E-ISSN 1872-6054, Vol. 107, no 1, 91-97 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There has been an increasing effort across Europe to develop national policies in food and nutrition during the last decade. However, little is known about how public health nutrition issues get on the public health agenda and the roles individuals have when these agendas are being set.

Objectives: The aims of this study were to scrutinise the development process of the Slovenian national food and nutrition policy, and to identify the roles and functions of individuals who have contributed to that process.

Methods: This study undertook a qualitative approach. Data collection included 18 semi-structured interviews between 2007 and 2011, and grey and scientific literature search. Text analysis was based on Kingdon's streams model, which involved highlighting the relationship between problem identification, policy solutions and political opportunities. Data were coded to identify the roles and functions of individuals participating in the agenda-setting process.

Results: The analysis showed that the opportunity for the Slovenian food and nutrition policy to be developed was largely explained by a change in political circumstances, namely the accession of Slovenia to the European Union and the Common Agricultural Policy. Individuals with experience in policy development were identified because of their analytical, strategic and policy entrepreneurial skills. The analyst was responsible for communicating the key nutrition issues to policy-makers, the strategist joined international networks and promoted policy solutions from international experts including the World Health Organization, and the policy entrepreneur took advantage of the political situation to enlist the participation of previous opponents to a national nutrition policy.

Conclusion: This study found that individuals, their roles and skills, played an important role in the development of the Slovenian National Food and Nutrition Policy. The roles and functions of these individuals, which are identified in this study, may assist future endeavours to advance public health nutrition as a key political issue.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Clare, Ireland: Elsevier, 2012. Vol. 107, no 1, 91-97 p.
Keyword [en]
Public health nutrition, agenda-setting, food and nutrition policy, policy entrepreneur, rolen, functions
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalization Studies)
Research subject
Culinary Arts and Meal Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:oru:diva-47593DOI: 10.1016/j.healthpol.2012.06.005ISI: 000308685300010PubMedID: 22771079Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84864850644OAI: oai:DiVA.org:oru-47593DiVA: diva2:895506
Note

funded by DG Educaiton and Culture - the JOBNUT project

Available from: 2016-01-19 Created: 2016-01-19 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

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