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On the way to knowledge awareness in early design
Luleå University of Technology. (Product Development Research Lab)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4875-391X
Luleå University of Technology. (Product Development Research Lab)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9662-4576
2007 (English)In: / [ed] Frank-Lothar Krause, Berlin, Germany: Springer , 2007, 607-616 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper discusses views on decision support in product development to identify factors of relevance when designing computer-based decision sup- port for total offers. Providing services in form of physical artefacts of- fered as ‘functions per unit’ is at the heart of total offers. Total offers gain access to possibilities to ‘design in’ value added characteristics into the physical artefact, e.g., maintenance, monitoring, training, remanufacture. Contemporary computer tools seem to be insufficient to support a GO/NO GO decision for total offers. Relevant factors to take into consideration are to support learning and provide the decision makers with insights in a number of plausible ‘what-if’ scenarios to improve the solution space.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin, Germany: Springer , 2007. 607-616 p.
Keyword [en]
Product development, decision-making process, decision support, collaborative engineering
National Category
Other Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:bth-11287ISBN: 978-3-540-69819-7 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:bth-11287DiVA: diva2:889490
Conference
17th CIRP Design Conference - The Future of Product Development
Note

10.1007/978-3-540-69820-3_59

Available from: 2015-12-26 Created: 2015-12-18 Last updated: 2016-09-20Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Knowledge maturity as decision support in stage-gate product development: a case from the aerospace industry
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Knowledge maturity as decision support in stage-gate product development: a case from the aerospace industry
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In today’s fast-paced industry where fight for market share is fierce and reaching the market ahead of competition imperative, product development is a target for lead-time reductions. In this context, in product development in stage-gate processes, decisions need to be made even though knowledge and information are scarce and flawed. The challenge is how to support the decisions that are made in light of uncertainty and ambiguity. The thesis moves from analysing the role of the stage-gate process within the aerospace industry. The stage-gate process was more than a decision making mechanism, and instead a mechanism that facilitated communication, discussion and knowledge sharing between team members, as well as supported knowledge creation and shaping of the boundaries between people’s different perceptions of the knowledge base. However, the communicative and negotiative function of the stage-gate was highly dependent on the ability of the participating individuals to reflect on the status and quality of the available knowledge assets used throughout the process. To make this reflective activity an explicit part of the stage-gate practice, this thesis proposes the application of a knowledge maturity concept at the gates to raise the decision makers’ awareness of the status of the knowledge assets handled at the decision point. The knowledge maturity concept considers three basic dimensions: input, method/tool and experience/expertise in assessing the knowledge base maturity. The scale is intended to act as a boundary object, facilitating the knowledge creation process by highlighting the current status of the knowledge base and making stakeholders aware of the nature of the project’s uncertainties and ambiguities. In the knowledge maturity concept, its purpose is to support design teams at the gates in taking appropriate action, mitigating risk and focusing their efforts on improving the knowledge assets where it is needed most, regarding the situation at hand and, finally, to make more confident decisions.The thesis was developed within the EU FP6 VIVACE (Value Improvement through a Virtual Aeronautical Collaborative Enterprise) and EU FP7 CRESCENDO (Collaborative and Robust Engineering using Simulation Capability Enabling Next Design Optimisation) projects, and within the Faste Laboratory, a VINNOVA Excellence Centre involving partners from the Swedish manufacturing industry.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2009. 67 p.
Series
Doctoral thesis / Luleå University of Technology, ISSN 1402-1544
Keyword
Knowledge Maturity, Knowledge Management, Stage-Gate, Decision Support, Product Development, Product-Service Systems, Aerospace
National Category
Other Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-12129 (URN)978-91-7439-050-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2009-12-18, B192, Luleå, 01:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework ProgrammeVINNOVA
Available from: 2016-06-17 Created: 2016-06-17 Last updated: 2016-06-17Bibliographically approved
2. Knowledge engineering in the virtual enterprise: exploring a maturity-based decision support
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Knowledge engineering in the virtual enterprise: exploring a maturity-based decision support
2007 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In product development, lead-time reduction, cost reduction, and quality improvement are issues that companies want to improve on to increase competitiveness. One recent approach to reach this - particularly in the aerospace industry where the complexity of product offers is steadily increasing - is to manage risk by forming virtual enterprises. A virtual enterprise is a network of partner companies that join on equal terms when an opportunity arises to develop a product offer, e.g. a jet engine offer, in a more agile manner than if any of the partners would realise it by themselves. They therefore team up to share risk, investment and resources - to in return also share revenue and profit. A driver for the formation of the virtual enterprise is the ability to effectively utilise partner knowledge assets. However, when sharing and managing knowledge effectively across the virtual enterprise, current practices have yet to evolve to meet the needs of knowledge workers, who may come from different aerospace companies, have different roles, belong to different disciplines and that may also be situated in geographically dispersed locations.

Improving product development includes allowing developers from all disciplines to know - as early as possible in the product development process - more about the customer needs, the desired product properties, and the downstream impact of the decisions they choose to make throughout the process. Knowing about the impact in downstream phases would allow for significant time and cost savings due to the avoidance of unnecessary and expensive rework that would otherwise occur much further on in the product's life cycle.

Among other things, a virtual enterprise can start organising and mapping the knowledge assets available in their teams, and information overload can be managed by assuring that the right knowledge ends up with the right person, to mention but a few things that can facilitate the everyday work of engineers and their colleagues. When working in a product development project, the virtual enterprise needs to assess the quality of the created knowledge as early as possible to devise the correct actions early. In this thesis, a Gated Maturity Assessment technique including the concept of knowledge maturity has been developed as an example of an improved stage-gate decision-making process. With this approach development teams are able to assess the knowledge maturity level in the content and rationale that is put forward as a basis for a decision - as opposed to only assessing the raw data of the results (i.e. thrust, weight, fuel burn, etc.). Knowledge maturity is used to support decision makers when in the process of assessing a decision base to make a decision whether to go ahead, abort the process, or order rework to be done. Naturally, if the decision base is poor, a decision to go ahead should probably not be taken, as the consequences might be negative. In assessing maturity, decision makers can determine at decision points if the knowledge base is good enough to move forward to the next step in the jet engine component design, if there is need for rework, and what specific areas need to be improved. Decision makers can divert and focus resources to areas of importance due to, for instance, too low maturity levels.

Knowledge maturity is a way to - using a criteria scale that prescribes the knowledge needed at each level - help development teams assess and visualise how well they know what they know, and subsequently, what they need to know. This thesis explores the feasibility of using knowledge maturity as a way of supporting knowledge engineering in the context of a development process in aeronautics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2007. 39 p.
Series
Licentiate thesis / Luleå University of Technology, ISSN 1402-1757 ; 2007:64
Keyword
Knowledge Engineering, Knowledge Maturity, Functional Product Development, Decision Making
National Category
Other Mechanical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:bth-12101 (URN)
Opponent
Supervisors
Projects
Faste Laboratory
Funder
VINNOVAEU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme
Available from: 2016-06-17 Created: 2016-06-16 Last updated: 2016-06-17Bibliographically approved

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Johansson, ChristianLarsson, Tobias

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