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Culture and religious beliefs in relation to reproductive health
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Internationell kvinno- & mödrahälsovård och migration/Essén)
Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Sweden.
2016 (English)In: Baillière's Best Practice & Research: Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology, ISSN 1521-6934, E-ISSN 1532-1932, Vol. 32, 77-87 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An increasing number of contemporary research publications acknowledge the influence of religion and culture on sexual and reproductive behavior and health-care utilization. It is currently hypothesized that religious influences can partly explain disparities in sexual and reproductive health outcomes. In this paper, we will pay particular attention to Muslims in sexual and reproductive health care. This review reveals that knowledge about devout Muslims' own experience of sexual and reproductive health-care matters is limited, thus providing weak evidence for modeling of efficient practical guidelines for sexual and reproductive health care directed at Muslim patients. Successful outcomes in sexual and reproductive health of Muslims require both researchers and practitioners to acknowledge religious heterogeneity and variability, and individuals' possibilities to negotiate Islamic edicts. Failure to do so could lead to inadequate health-care provision and, in the worst case, to suboptimal encounters between migrants with Muslim background and the health-care providers in the receiving country.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 32, 77-87 p.
Keyword [en]
Islam; Muslim patients; reproductive health; health care; health disparities; religion
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-269921DOI: 10.1016/j.bpobgyn.2015.08.011ISI: 000374075800009PubMedID: 26542927OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-269921DiVA: diva2:885477
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2015-12-18 Created: 2015-12-18 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved

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Arousell, Jonna

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