Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Indigenous research across continents: a comparison of ethically and culturally sound approaches to research in Australia and Sweden
Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. (Arcum)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4853-9641
University of South Australia.
2015 (English)In: Finding the common ground: narratives, provocations and reflections from the 40 year celebration of batchelor institute / [ed] Henk Huijser, Robyn Ober, Sandy O’Sullivan, Eva McRae-Williams, Ruth Elvin, Batchelor NT: Batchelor Press , 2015, 119-126 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the context of opposition to, or absence of, ethical engagement in Indigenous research, researchers aremorally obligated to make a stand that ensures their engagement strategy and implementation plan uses an approach based on positionality, participation, mutual respect, and partnership. Whilst this may involve new challenges for the researcher, such an initiative maximises the likelihood of an empowering and culturally safe process for vulnerable participants, including inexperienced researchers. As two early career researchers, we reflect on our experiences amidst some of the challenges within Indigenous research. These challenges include ethical, methodological and structural issues. The main aims of this chapter are to advocate for practical and philosophical reform of Indigenous research ethics particularly in the context of decolonisation; ultimately to maximise the benefits of research primarily for community research participants, service providers, and policy makers as opposed to primarily for the academy. The authors' experiential and theoretical knowledge enables a critical understanding of the philosophical underpinnings of a decolonising research approach and how this guides the development of an appropriate ethics protocol. We acknowledge that research impacts on Indigenous peoples' lives, often in a negative or unintended manner, and its governance varies dramatically according to individual as well as institutional values that are steeped in Western thought including colonialism. This paper draws on scholarly theoretical knowledge of cultural protocols and the governance of ethical processes from international and local sources, as well as our own experiences in cross-cultural communication to articulate what we call a Decolonising Standpoint. We regard this as a necessary addition to the implementation of an Indigenous Standpoint in the context of research, which has provided a highly credible philosophy and practice for Indigenous researchers. We aim to create an additional and quite distinct position that non-Indigenous researchers can add to their repertoire of skills and knowledge in the context of Indigenous research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Batchelor NT: Batchelor Press , 2015. 119-126 p.
National Category
Cultural Studies Ethnology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-112307ISBN: 978-1-74131-310-9 (electronic)ISBN: 978-1-74131-309-3 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-112307DiVA: diva2:876758
Available from: 2015-12-04 Created: 2015-12-04 Last updated: 2017-01-25Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Extractive Violence on Indigenous Country: sami and Aboriginal Views on Conflicts and Power Relations with Extractive Industries
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Extractive Violence on Indigenous Country: sami and Aboriginal Views on Conflicts and Power Relations with Extractive Industries
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Alternative title[sv]
Extraktivt våld på urfolks marker : konflikter och maktrelationer mellan utvinningsindustrier och urfolk i Sverige och Australien
Abstract [en]

Asymmetrical conflicts and power relations between extractive industries and Indigenous groups often have devastating consequences for Indigenous peoples. Many Indigenous groups are struggling to maintain their lands as Indigenous perspectives on connection to Country are frequently undervalued or dismissed in favour of extractivist ideologies. While this conflicted interface has been researched in various parts of the world, studies exploring conflicts and power relations with extractive industries from Indigenous perspectives are few.

This thesis is an international comparison aiming to illuminate situations of conflict and asymmetrical power relations caused by extractivism on Indigenous lands from new viewpoints. By drawing on two single case studies, the situations for Laevas reindeer herding Sami community in northern Sweden and Adnyamathanha Traditional Owners in South Australia are compared and contrasted. Yarning (a form of interviewing) is used as a method for data collection and in order to stay as true as possible to the research participants’ own words a number of direct quotes are used. The analysis employs peace researcher Johan Galtung’s concepts of cultural and structural violence as analytical tools to further explore the participants’ experiences of interactions with extractive industries and industrial proponents, including governments. In addition, the thesis introduces the concept of extractive violence as a complement to Galtung’s model. Extractive violence is defined as a form of direct violence against people and/or animals and nature caused by extractivism, which predominantly impacts peoples closely connected to land. The concepts of structural and cultural violence are understood as unjust societal structures and racist and discriminating attitudes respectively.

A number of main themes could be identified in the research participants’ narratives. However, the most prominent on both continents was connections to Country and the threat that extractive violence posed to these connections.

The results show that although the expressions of cultural, structural and extractive violence experienced by the two Indigenous communities varied, the impacts were strikingly similar. Both communities identified extractive violence, supported by structural and cultural violence, as threats to the continuation of their societies and entire cultures. Furthermore, the results suggest that in order to address violence against Indigenous peoples and achieve conflict transformation, Indigenous and decolonising perspectives should be heard and taken into account.

Abstract [sv]

Konflikter och maktrelationer mellan utvinningsindustrier och urfolksgrupper får ofta förödande konsekvenser för urfolken. På grund av assymetriska maktförhållanden mellan urfolk och majoritetssamhällen som råder på de flesta ställen i världen utsätts många urfolk systematiskt för rättighetskränkningar. Många urfolksgrupper kämpar idag för att bevara sina marker eftersom urfolks perspektiv och kopplingar till marken ofta förminskas eller ignoreras när de står i motsättning till extraktiva ideologier. Även om extraktivism och påverkan på urfolk och urfolksgrupper varit fokus för tidigare studier saknas forskning som utgår från urfolkens perspektiv.

Denna avhandling är en internationell jämförelse med syfte att, från nya synvinklar, belysa konfliktsituationer och asymmetriska maktrelationer som orsakats av extraktivism på urfolks marker. Avhandlingen jämför och kontrasterar två fallstudier som utförts med Laevas č earru (sameby) i norra Sverige och Adnyamathanha-folket i delstaten South Australia. I fallstudien som utförts tillsammans med Laevas č earru ingår en grupp av totalt sex forskningsdeltagare, fyra män och två kvinnor. Det var dock framför allt två forskningsdeltagare som intervjuades med anledning av den konfliktsituation mellan Laevas č earru och gruvbolaget LKAB, som står i fokus för artikel I i avhandlingen. I den australiska fallstudien, som utförts tillsammans med Adnyamathanha-folket, ingår en grupp av sju forskningsdeltagare bestående av fyra kvinnor och tre män. Denna studie, artikel II, behandlar Adnyamathanhafolkets kamp mot de australiska och sydaustraliska regeringarnas förslag om att inrätta kärnavfallsdepåer på Adnyamathanhas marker. För att inhämta material användes yarning (en typ av intervjumetod) och för att återge forskningsdeltagarnas ord så rättvisande möjligt inkluderades ett antal direktcitat i texterna. För att möjliggöra en mer djupgående analys av forskningsdeltagarnas upplevelser av konflikter med utvinningsindustrier och förespråkare för extraktivism, inklusive regeringar och stater, användes Johan Galtungs modell, känd som Galtungs våldstriangel, som analysverktyg. Galtungs modell innefattar strukturellt, kulturellt och direkt våld. Direkt våld definieras som fysiskt våld eller hot om fysiskt våld, strukturellt våld utgörs av orättvisa och diskriminerande samhällsstrukturer och kulturellt våld är de attityder som får det strukturella och således även det direkta våldet att te sig legitimt. Föreliggande avhandling introducerar även konceptet extraktivt våld som ett komplement till Galtungs modell där xvi det ersätter direkt våld. Jag definierar extraktivt våld som en typ av direkt våld mot människor och/eller djur och natur orsakat av extraktivism som framför allt påverkar människor med starka kopplingar till sina marker. Extraktivism förstås här som alla typer av aktiviteter som extraherar stora mängder av resurser från marker och människor, exempelvis gruvdrift, skogsbruk, fiske, lantbruk och turism. I forskningsdeltagarnas utsagor identifierades ett antal nyckelteman. Dessa teman uppvisade både likheter och skillnader beroende på deltagarnas olika situationer och förutsättningar. Det mest framträdande temat på båda kontinenterna var dock ”connection to Country” eller kopplingar till marken. Båda grupperna beskrev hur marken och deras förhållande till den innefattade historia, kunskap, traditioner och kultur. För Adnyamathanhagruppen var det mest centrala att rädda och bevara heliga platser som hotas av extraktivism och för Laevas č earru sågs renskötseln och bevarandet av markerna för renarnas skull som det mest väsentliga.

Avhandlingens resultat visar att även om de former av kulturellt, strukturellt och extraktivt våld som forskningsdeltagarna upplevde varierade, var effekterna av våldet slående lika. Båda grupperna identifierade extraktivt våld, understött av strukturellt och kulturellt våld, som hot mot fortlevnaden av deras samhällen och kulturer. Resultaten pekar även på vikten av att urfolkens perspektiv inkluderas och blir hörda om konflikttransformering mellan utvinningsindustrier och urfolk ska kunna uppnås.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå Universitet, 2017. 53 p.
Series
Samiska studier, ISSN 1651-5153 ; 8Etnologiska skrifter, ISSN 1103-6516 ; 64
Keyword
Aboriginal, Adnyamathanha, Australia, conflict, cultural violence, extractive industries, extractive violence, Indigenous peoples, Laevas cearru, LKAB, nuclear waste repository, Sami, structural violence, Sweden, Aboriginer, Adnyamathanha, Australien, konflikt, kulturellt våld, kärnavfallsdepå, Laevas cearru, LKAB, samer, strukturellt våld, Sverige, utvinningsindustrier, urfolk
National Category
Other Humanities Ethnology
Research subject
Ethnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-130590 (URN)978-91-7601-657-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-02-17, Hörsal F, Humanisthuset, Umeå Universitet, Umeå, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-01-27 Created: 2017-01-24 Last updated: 2017-02-01Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(307 kB)247 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT02.pdfFile size 307 kBChecksum SHA-512
fdb4d5fd90a25c11468e217248e13af3ead6195fb610658a8fe9d2bc0be0bf7cdfa875991d82f5dd338c4a101700a10cde959d53ead602578596260521492806
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

URL

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Sehlin MacNeil, Kristina
By organisation
Centre for Sami ResearchDepartment of culture and media studies
Cultural StudiesEthnology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 247 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Total: 412 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf