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Electronic plants
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8845-6296
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2015 (English)In: Science Advances, ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 1, no 10, 1-8 p., e1501136Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The roots, stems, leaves, and vascular circuitry of higher plants are responsible for conveying the chemical signals that regulate growth and functions. From a certain perspective, these features are analogous to the contacts, interconnections, devices, and wires of discrete and integrated electronic circuits. Although many attempts have been made to augment plant function with electroactive materials, plants’ “circuitry” has never been directlymerged with electronics. We report analog and digital organic electronic circuits and devices manufactured in living plants. The four key components of a circuit have been achieved using the xylem, leaves, veins, and signals of the plant as the template and integral part of the circuit elements and functions. With integrated and distributed electronics in plants, one can envisage a range of applications including precision recording and regulation of physiology, energy harvesting from photosynthesis, and alternatives to genetic modification for plant optimization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association for the Advancement of Science , 2015. Vol. 1, no 10, 1-8 p., e1501136
National Category
Botany Plant Biotechnology Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering Forest Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122880DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1501136OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-122880DiVA: diva2:874323
Available from: 2015-11-26 Created: 2015-11-26 Last updated: 2017-02-03

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Stavrinidou, EleniGabrielsson, RogerGomez, EliotCrispin, XavierSimon, Daniel T.Berggren, Magnus
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Physics and ElectronicsFaculty of Science & Engineering
BotanyPlant BiotechnologyElectrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information EngineeringForest Science

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