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Archaeology and the future: Managing nuclear waste as a living heritage
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0557-9651
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. (Arkeologi)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8747-4131
2015 (English)In: Radioactive Waste Management and Constructing Memory for Future Generations: Proceedings of the International Conference and Debate, 15-17 September 2014, Verdun, France, OECD Publishing, 2015, 97-101 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Archaeology is the study of the past and its remains in the present. It is relevant to the long-term preservation of records, knowledge and memory, e.g. regarding final repositories of nuclear waste, in two ways. Firstly, future archaeology may promise the recovery of lost information, knowledge and meaning of remains of the past. Secondly, present-day archaeology can offer lessons about how future societies will make sense of remains of the past.

Archaeology is always situated in a larger social and cultural context and the information, knowledge and meaning it generates is necessarily of its own present. Archaeological knowledge reflects contemporary perceptions of past and future; these perceptions change over time. Indeed, we cannot assume that in the future there will be any archaeology at all. We think, therefore, that future societies will want, and need, to make their own decisions about sites associated with nuclear waste, based on their own perceptions of past and future. To facilitate this process in the long term we need to engage each present, keeping safe options open.

In this text we elaborate on these issues from our perspective as archaeologists.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OECD Publishing, 2015. 97-101 p.
Series
Nuclear Energy Agency, NEA, 7259
National Category
Archaeology Social Anthropology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-47357OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-47357DiVA: diva2:873030
Conference
International Conference and Debate, 15-17 September 2014, Verdun, France
Available from: 2015-11-22 Created: 2015-11-22 Last updated: 2016-05-03Bibliographically approved

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Holtorf, CorneliusHögberg, Anders

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