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Temporal and spatial carbon dioxide concentration patterns in a small boreal lake in relation to ice cover dynamics
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Limnology.
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2015 (English)In: Boreal environment research, ISSN 1239-6095, E-ISSN 1797-2469, Vol. 20, no 6, 679-692 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Global carbon dioxide (CO2) emission estimates from inland waters commonly neglect the ice-cover season. To account for CO2 accumulation below ice and consequent emissions into the atmosphere at ice-melt we combined automatically-monitored and manually- sampled spatially-distributed CO2 concentration measurements from a small boreal ice-covered lake in Sweden. In early winter, CO2 accumulated continuously below ice, whereas, in late winter, CO2 concentrations remained rather constant. At ice-melt, two CO2 concentration peaks were recorded, the first one reflecting lateral CO2 transport within the upper water column, and the second one reflecting vertical CO2 transport from bottom waters. We estimated that 66%–85% of the total CO2 accumulated in the water below ice left the lake at ice-melt, while the remainder was stored in bottom waters. Our results imply that CO2 accumulation under ice and emissions at ice-melt are more dynamic than previously reported, and thus need to be more accurately integrated into annual CO2 emission estimates from inland waters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 20, no 6, 679-692 p.
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-267129ISI: 000366959400002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-267129DiVA: diva2:872262
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council FormasEU, European Research Council
Available from: 2015-11-18 Created: 2015-11-18 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Greenhouse Gas Dynamics in Ice-covered Lakes Across Spatial and Temporal Scales
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Greenhouse Gas Dynamics in Ice-covered Lakes Across Spatial and Temporal Scales
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Lakes play a major role in the global carbon (C) cycle, despite making up a small area of earth’s surface. Lakes receive, transport and process sizable amounts of C, emitting a substantial amount of the greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), into the atmosphere. Ice-covered lakes are particularly sensitive to climate change, as future reductions to the duration of lake ice cover will have profound effects on the biogeochemical cycling of C in lakes. It is still largely unknown how reduced ice cover duration will affect CO2 and CH4 emissions from ice-covered lakes. Thus, the primary aim of this thesis was to fill this knowledge gap by monitoring the spatial and temporal dynamics of CO2 and CH4 in ice-covered lakes. The results of this thesis demonstrate that below ice CO2 and CH4 were spatially and temporally variable. Nutrients were strongly linked to below ice CO2 and CH4 oxidation variations across lakes. In addition, below ice CO2 was generally highest in small shallow lakes, and in bottom waters. Whilst below ice CH4 was elevated in surface waters near where bubbles from anoxic lake sediment were trapped. During the ice-cover period, CO2 accumulation below ice was not linear, and at ice-melt incomplete mixing of lake waters resulted in a continued CO2 storage in bottom waters. Further, CO2 transported from the catchment and bottom waters contributed to high CO2 emissions. The collective findings of this thesis indicate that CO2 and CH4 emissions from ice-covered lakes will likely increase in the future. The strong relationship between nutrients and C processes below ice, imply that future changes to nutrient fluxes within lakes will influence the biogeochemical cycling of C in lakes. Since catchment and lake sediment C fluxes play a considerable role in below ice CO2 and CH4 dynamics, changes to hydrology and thermal stability of lakes will undoubtedly alter CO2 and CH4 emissions. Nevertheless, ice-covered lakes constitute a significant component of the global C cycle, and as such, should be carefully monitored and accounted for when addressing the impacts of global climate change.  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2016. 53 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 1341
Keyword
carbon cycle, climate change, cryosphere, carbon dioxide, methane, lakes, winter limnology, methane oxidation, nutrients, catchment
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Limnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-275018 (URN)978-91-554-9467-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-03-18, Friessalen, Evolutionary Biology Centre (EBC), Norbyvägen 14, Uppsala, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2016-02-26 Created: 2016-01-28 Last updated: 2016-03-09

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