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Buyer-Supplier Innovation: Managing Supplier Knowledge in Collaborative Innovation
Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Project Innovations and Entrepreneurship. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2015. , 98 p.
Series
Linköping Studies in Science and Technology. Dissertations, ISSN 0345-7524 ; 1726
National Category
Business Administration Economics and Business
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122506ISBN: 978-91-7685-893-6 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-122506DiVA: diva2:867659
Supervisors
Note

As David Rosell’s dissertation represents all parts; the articles are finalized, onlya quite limited amount of work remained on the extended summary, and it can beconsidered as a thorough academic work, we (his main advisor AssociateProfessor Nicolette Lakemond and second advisor Assistant Professor CeciliaEnberg) have decided to publish the dissertation in order to make it available tothe research community. The dissertation has not been defended and is notapproved posthumous but only published making it available for the researchcommunity.

Available from: 2015-11-06 Created: 2015-11-06 Last updated: 2015-11-06Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Collaborative innovation with suppliers: a conceptual model for characterising supplier contributions to NPD
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collaborative innovation with suppliers: a conceptual model for characterising supplier contributions to NPD
2011 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

It is widely acknowledged that suppliers contribute positively to innovation in New Product Development (NPD). However, it remains rather unclear what suppliers actually contribute to innovation. Based on a literature review focusing on 80 articles and a focus group meeting with strategic purchasing managers, a conceptual framework is developed categorising different supplier inputs to innovation. This model is formulated by characterising supplier inputs on a component level and an architectural level, related to knowledge extension and knowledge reconfi guration, respectively. Further, supplier inputs can be incremental or radical in nature, resulting in either a dependence on the supplier’s process knowledge or the supplier’s technology knowledge. These situations imply different conditions for knowledge integration.

Keyword
Collaborative innovation; supplier collaboration; supplier input; conceptual model; new product development; literature review; incremental innovation; radical innovation; component; system
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-79571 (URN)
Conference
The R&D Management Conference 2011, Norrköping, Sweden 28-30 June
Available from: 2013-02-19 Created: 2012-08-09 Last updated: 2015-11-06Bibliographically approved
2. Integrating External Knowledge in New Product Development: The Influence of SupplierKnowledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrating External Knowledge in New Product Development: The Influence of SupplierKnowledge
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

When firms become increasingly dependent on external knowledge to be innovative and competitive, new product development (NPD) transforms into an activity focused on integrating external and internal knowledge bases. Consequently, firms need to open up their firm boundaries while at the same time manage the dilemma of risk of undesirable knowledge leakages. Little is known on how firms tackle the need for openness and risk of losing proprietary knowledge in different types of NPD processes. In fact, the knowledge based view of the firm and organizational economics give diverging answers to this dilemma. By conducting a multiple-case study of buyer-supplier collaborations in new product development (NPD), two main approaches to manage supplier knowledge in innovation emerge; knowledge absorption and joint knowledge accumulation. Knowledge absorption emphasizes technical interfaces and limited interaction for accessing knowledge of suppliers and was found in conjunction with exploitative activities. Joint knowledge accumulation represents joint and interactive learning between the buyer and the supplier and took place in more demanding explorative innovation. The findings indicate that managers make deliberate choices between increasing openness and minimizing the risk of losing proprietary knowledge based on the specific demands of the NPD task and the knowledge of the suppliers. By using different knowledge integration mechanisms, managers balance trust and control, a collaborative relation and a more restricted. Interestingly, the dilemma between openness and the risk of knowledge leakage is more or less managed within the knowledge integration mechanisms themselves, not primary by relying on external transactional governance mechanisms.

National Category
Business Administration Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122504 (URN)
Available from: 2015-11-06 Created: 2015-11-06 Last updated: 2015-11-06Bibliographically approved
3. Integrating knowledge with suppliers at the R&D-manufacturing interface
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrating knowledge with suppliers at the R&D-manufacturing interface
2014 (English)In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 25, no 2, 240-257 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – Many manufacturing firms source components and subsystems from suppliers. Consequently, the suppliers' product and manufacturing knowledge is a central concern at the interface between R&D and manufacturing. This paper aims to specifically investigate how supplier knowledge is integrated and what role trust plays in knowledge integration with suppliers at the R&D-manufacturing interface.

Design/methodology/approach – The study is based on qualitative case studies of two different collaborations with suppliers at one firm.

Findings – Two distinct processes are identified. First, capturing represents knowledge integration through decoupling, for which a basic level of trust specifically with regard to the competence of the supplier is necessary. Capturing can take place through interactions that are limited in time and scope. Second, joint learning represents a coupled knowledge integration process and takes place during a more extended period of time preceding and following the R&D-manufacturing interface and builds on relational-based trust.

Practical implications – The interface between R&D and manufacturing needs to be extended to include a focus on suppliers' contributions in terms of product and manufacturing knowledge. The choice for suitable knowledge integration processes needs to be guided by concerns about the level of trust and the character of the supplier contributions.

Originality/value – The paper adds new insights to previous literature by distinguishing between different types of knowledge integration processes and levels of trust. It bridges the gap between innovation and operations management and clearly shows that the interface between R&D and manufacturing crosses organizational borders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2014
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106411 (URN)10.1108/JMTM-12-2013-0171 (DOI)2-s2.0-84897878895 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-05-07 Created: 2014-05-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
4. In pursuit of control: involving suppliers of critical technologies in new product development
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In pursuit of control: involving suppliers of critical technologies in new product development
2014 (English)In: Supply chain management, ISSN 1359-8546, E-ISSN 1758-6852, Vol. 19, no 5-6, 722-732 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the dynamics of management and control in collaborations with suppliers of critical technology.

Design/methodology/approach – Three collaborative product development projects at a system integrator in the Telecom industry were studied. The data was collected through 22 semi-structured interviews and a workshop at the studied company and its suppliers.

Findings – The paper shows that in situations of high dependence on suppliers of critical technologies, control may be pursued by complementing black box development with appropriate checks and balances in the collaboration, i.e. by using combinations of control mechanisms, disconnected development and joint problem solving, contracts and trust, and alignment efforts on project and strategic levels. Further, the paper demonstrates that this involves several trade-offs related to the advantages of increased monitoring and disadvantages of decreased levels of freedom for the supplier and consequently decreased prerequisites for supplier creativity.

Research limitations/implications – The qualitative approach of the research limits generalizability. Our study is limited to three projects at one firm.

Practical implications – Technological roadmaps can be used as an important tool to facilitate alignment with suppliers of critical technologies. Limited influence on project level can be supported by influencing the supplier on a strategic level. By collaborating on a strategic level, firms can gain alignment for future projects and diminish the need for direct project control within the projects. Long-term collaborations facilitate control in projects with powerful suppliers of critical technologies.

Originality/value – While many studies suggest simplified responses to complex situations of supplier involvement in product development, this study provides insight into the complex responses to control suppliers of critical technologies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2014
Keyword
New product development, Supplier involvement, Control, Goal alignment
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103938 (URN)10.1108/SCM-01-2014-0040 (DOI)000345150800014 ()
Available from: 2014-02-04 Created: 2014-02-04 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
5. Implementation of Open Innovation Strategies: A Byers-Supplier Perspective
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implementation of Open Innovation Strategies: A Byers-Supplier Perspective
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1363-9196, E-ISSN 1757-5877, Vol. 18, no 06, -23 p., 1440013Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The open innovation concept has been discussed for more than a decade. However, there are relatively few studies related to implementation of open innovation. Barriers of implementation have been identified, but they are not related to the external knowledge searched for. This multiple-case study adds to current understanding of implementing open innovation strategies by focusing on the cooperation and coordination challenges when opening up for different types of supplier knowledge. Possible solutions and trade-offs between short-term benefits and long-term goals are presented that take into consideration the character of knowledge and human behavior. By applying theories such as knowledge-based view and transaction cost theories on empirical findings, different explanations are sought that bring new insights into managing open innovation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
World Scientific, 2014
Keyword
Open innovation; strategies; implementation; buyer–supplier perspective; cooperation; coordination; exploration; exploitation
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122505 (URN)10.1142/S1363919614400131 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-11-06 Created: 2015-11-06 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved

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