Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Hegemony and power structures in Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
2015 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Salman Rushdie’s The Satanic Versesis one of the most controversial postcolonial novels, which among a plethora of themes seems to mainly focus on the notion of hegemonic power. The Satanic Verses can partly be read as a denunciation of the British hegemony in which social injustice, racial discrimination and violence, in its different forms, exerted upon marginalized and stigmatized people (such as non-European expatriates) are legitimized by the dominant group and understood as something conventional and normal by the subjugated people. Moreover, this novel encourages the readers to criticize religion as a political tool with the help of which the dominant group can make groups of people subservient to authority. This part of my essay is related to the criticism of hegemony as such. Employing Gramsci’s analysis of hegemony, this paper begins with an investigation of the relationship between the figure of a migrant, violence and cultural hegemony inRushdie’s Britain. In the second part, the link between dream scenes and the ways through which they contribute to the overall argument about hegemony is studied. Finally, the last part of this essay revolves around religious hegemony. Hence, what links all these three sections together is the concept of hegemony and the ways through which hegemonic power is achieved and implemented in this novel.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. , p. 44
Keyword [en]
Salman Rushdie; The Satanic Verses; cultural hegemony; religious hegemony; structural violence; social injustice; racial discrimination; migrancy
National Category
Humanities Languages and Literature
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-118507OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-118507DiVA, id: diva2:824248
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2017-03-02 Created: 2015-06-21 Last updated: 2017-03-02Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(162 kB)33 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 162 kBChecksum SHA-512
9cd549c8b09ac12c8355d60d30acd559081646f89ebe0b6712d986fd6cea80cfe1997190065e834dd7bf8b59b7eccadee1e8f6b400445bca147f1498479223e4
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

By organisation
Department of Culture and Aesthetics
HumanitiesLanguages and Literature

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 33 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 82 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf