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The drive for change: putting the means and ends of sport at stake in the organizing of Swedish voluntary sport
Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)Alternative title
På jakt efter något nytt : om förändringsprocesser i organiseringen av svensk föreningsidrott (Swedish)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this thesis is to create knowledge on processes of change in the contemporary organizing of Swedish voluntary sport and the systems of meaning at work in these processes. The thesis proceeds from the assumption that the contemporary public sport policy climate is characterized by a pressure on organized sport to change in order for sport to better serve as an implementer of non-sport goals. In attempting to capture the possible ramifications of this pressure on the organizing of voluntary sport, the thesis work relies on the argument that processes of change are best captured in instances where new and established ideas are confronted with one another. Following this argument and drawing upon the concept of theorization, the first research question treated in the thesis concerns how legitimacy is established for a new practice (reported in Article 1). The second research question addressed is how, why, and with what consequences new ideas on organizing are implemented in sport organizations (reported in Article 2 & 3). In relation to this question, the concepts of translation and organizational identity are mobilized in the analysis. Empirically, these two questions are addressed using data from 29 interviews covering the emergence and organizing of organized spontaneous sport, so-called Drive in sport, in four Swedish municipalities. The analysis relating to these two questions shows that the same systems of meaning invoked to legitimize and specify Drive-in sport as a practice that has the potential to remedy problems being faced by both the Swedish society and the Swedish sports movement, also made Drive-in sport an unlikely developmental direction for the majority of implementing sport clubs. This process is understood with reference to a mismatch between the organizational identity of the clubs and the cultural material of the idea of Drive-in sport. This insight is brought into the formulation of the third research question treated in the thesis, which is concerned with sport clubs’ readiness, willingness, and ability to respond to policy changes (reported in Article 4). Building on data from short, qualitative interviews with representatives from 218 randomly selected sport clubs, 10 organizational identity categories are constructed. Between these categories, there is a variety of clubs’ core purposes, practices, and logics of action. The implications of this heterogeneity, in terms of sport clubs’ role as policy implementers, are discussed with reference to what clubs in each category might "imagine doing." The analysis provided in the thesis as a whole suggests that at stake in processes of change in the contemporary organizing of Swedish voluntary sport, is the very definition and meaning of sport.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University , 2015. , 104 p.
Series
Akademiska avhandlingar vid Pedagogiska institutionen, Umeå universitet, ISSN 0281-6768 ; 113
Keyword [en]
organizational institutionalism, institutional logics, community sport clubs, voluntary organizations, civil society, governance, organizational change, public policy, sport policy, policy implementation, popular movements
Keyword [sv]
institutionell teori, institutionella logiker, föreningsidrott, idrottsföreningar, idrottsrörelsen, folkrörelse, organisatorisk förändring, idrottspolitik, policy-implementering, civilsamhället, tredje sektorn
National Category
Pedagogy Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-102822ISBN: 978-91-7601-258-1 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:umu-102822DiVA: diva2:810261
Public defence
2015-06-05, Norra Beteendevetarhuset 1031, Umeå universitet, Umeå, 10:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2015-05-12 Created: 2015-05-06 Last updated: 2015-05-13Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. The emergence of a new logic?: The theorizing of a new practice in the highly institutionalized context of Swedish voluntary sport
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The emergence of a new logic?: The theorizing of a new practice in the highly institutionalized context of Swedish voluntary sport
2014 (English)In: Sport Management Review, ISSN 1441-3523, E-ISSN 1839-2083, Vol. 17, no 4, 507-519 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this article is to contribute to the understanding of the emergence and change in institutional logics by analyzing the theorization (e.g., Greenwood, Suddaby, & Hinings, 2002) of a new and distinctly "different" practice in Swedish voluntary sport: drive-in sport. The article builds on data from 29 interviews with key actors involved in the organizing of drive-in sport in four municipalities. The findings show that two problems were constructed to legitimize drive-in sport: norm-breaking behavior displayed by youth during weekend nights, and organized sport's failure to live up to a sport-for-all ideal. The findings also show that it is perceived that in order for drive-in sport to be the solution to both these problems, the activities need to be arranged in a particular way. The findings are discussed in relation to recent developments in Swedish organized sport as an institutional context. Additionally, the discussion puts forth the value of the theorization concept in terms of furthering our understanding of the social-constructionist interpretive processes that underpin the broader processes of change documented in previous sport-related studies of change in institutional logics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keyword
institutional change, sport clubs, interpretive work, qualitative analysis
National Category
Pedagogy Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-84822 (URN)10.1016/j.smr.2013.12.004 (DOI)000344830600010 ()
Available from: 2014-01-20 Created: 2014-01-20 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
2. Sport programme implementation as translation and organizational identity construction: the implementation of Drive-in sport in Swedish sports as an illustration
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sport programme implementation as translation and organizational identity construction: the implementation of Drive-in sport in Swedish sports as an illustration
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics, ISSN 1940-6940, Vol. 6, no 1, 55-69 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article outlines a theoretical framework to be used in the analysis of sport programme implementation. The need for such a framework resides in the increase in government interest in sport during the last decades, expressed in various top-down programmes positioning voluntary sports clubs as intended implementers, and in recent calls for a theoretical grounding of implementation analysis. The framework consists of two main parts. One is the translation perspective, proposed as an approach to understand sport programmes as open to (re)construction. The other is the organizational identity concept, proposed as a tool to understand how and why implementing organizations interpret and act upon, i.e., translate sport programmes. It is argued that the use of the framework, in tandem with the proposed methodological approach ‘follow the actor’, will provide new insights into the sport programme implementation analysis. An analysis of a national initiative on organized spontaneous sports, part of the Swedish government's programme ‘The Lift for Sport’, is used to illustrate the proposed framework.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Taylor & Francis, 2014
Keyword
sport policy, sport governance, organizational institutionalism, voluntary sport clubs, sport for all
National Category
Pedagogy Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-65843 (URN)10.1080/19406940.2013.766900 (DOI)
Note

Published online: 05 Feb 2013

Available from: 2013-02-12 Created: 2013-02-12 Last updated: 2015-05-12Bibliographically approved
3. The introduction of drive-in sport in community sport organizations as an example of organizational non-change
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The introduction of drive-in sport in community sport organizations as an example of organizational non-change
2013 (English)In: Journal of Sport Management, ISSN 0888-4773, E-ISSN 1543-270X, Vol. 27, no 6, 497-509 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this article is to understand change in community sport organizations (CSOs) by examining the introduction of spontaneous sport activities labeled drive-in sport in six Swedish CSOs. Drawing on the theoretical concepts of translation and organizational identity, data from 10 interviews were analyzed to answer how, why, and with what consequences, in terms of organizational change, the focal CSOs interpreted and acted upon the idea of drive-in sport. The findings show that while drive-in sport initially may seem to have changed the CSOs, a closer examination reveals a reproduction of their organizational identities. The findings are discussed in relation to the alignment of the drive-in sport idea with the CSOs’ core purpose and practices and with wider processes of change in the CSOs’ institutional context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Human Kinetics, 2013
Keyword
Institutional Theory, Organizational Identity, Voluntary Sport Organizations, Sport Clubs, Non-traditional Sport Programs, Non-profit Sport
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-76692 (URN)000332347900007 ()
Available from: 2013-07-10 Created: 2013-07-10 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
4. Same same, but different? Exploring the organizational identities of Swedish voluntary sports: possible implications of sports clubs’ self-identification for their role as implementers of policy objectives
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Same same, but different? Exploring the organizational identities of Swedish voluntary sports: possible implications of sports clubs’ self-identification for their role as implementers of policy objectives
2016 (English)In: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, ISSN 1012-6902, E-ISSN 1461-7218, Vol. 51, no 7, 867-883 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study is to contribute to the ongoing discussion of sports clubs’ propensity to act as policy implementers. Theoretically, we conceptualize this propensity as contingent on an alignment between a sports club’s organizational identity and the cultural material, that is, ends and means of a given policy. Building on data from short, qualitative interviews with representatives of 218 randomly selected sports clubs, we construct 10 organizational identity categories. Between these categories, there is a variety of clubs’ core purposes, practices and logics of action. The implications of this heterogeneity, in terms of sports clubs’ propensity to act as policy implementers, is discussed with reference to what clubs in each category might ‘imagine doing’. Also discussed are three avenues by which institutional conditions might affect the formation and change of sports clubs’ organizational identity, in turn having implications for their role as implementers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2016
Keyword
civil society, policy implementation, public policy, third sector, voluntary organizations
National Category
Pedagogy Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-95954 (URN)10.1177/1012690214557103 (DOI)000385717800006 ()
Note

Published online before print November 7, 2014.

Available from: 2014-11-10 Created: 2014-11-10 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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