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Insights on the Evolution of Mycoparasitism from the Genome of Clonostachys rosea
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2015 (English)In: Genome Biology and Evolution, ISSN 1759-6653, E-ISSN 1759-6653, Vol. 7, no 2, 465-480 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Clonostachys rosea is a mycoparasitic fungus that can control several important plant diseases. Here, we report on the genome sequencing of C. rosea and a comparative genome analysis, in order to resolve the phylogenetic placement of C. rosea and to study the evolution of mycoparasitism as a fungal lifestyle. The genome of C. rosea is estimated to 58.3 Mb, and contains 14,268 predicted genes. A phylogenomic analysis shows that C. Tosco clusters as sister taxon to plant pathogenic Fusarium species, with mycoparasitic/saprotrophic Tfichoderma species in an ancestral position. A comparative analysis of gene family evolution reveals several distinct differences between the included mycoparasites. Clonostachys rosea contains significantly more ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, polyketide synthases, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, pectin lyases, glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductases, and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases compared with other fungi in the Hypocreales. Interestingly, the increase of ABC transporter gene number in C. rosea is associated with phylogenetic subgroups B (multidrug resistance proteins) and G (pleiotropic drug resistance transporters), whereas an increase in subgroup C (multidrug resistance-associated proteins) is evident in Tfichoderma virens. In contrast with mycoparasitic Tfichoderma species, C. rosea contains very few chitinases. Expression of six group B and group G ABC transporter genes was induced in C. rosea during exposure to the Fusafium mycotoxin zearalenone, the fungicide Boscalid or metabolites from the biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas chiororaphis. The data suggest that tolerance toward secondary metabolites is a prominent feature in the biology of C. rosea.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 7, no 2, 465-480 p.
Keyword [en]
ABC transporter, biological control, Bionectria ochroleuca, fungicide, phylogeny, polyketide synthase
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Evolutionary Biology Genetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-251844DOI: 10.1093/gbe/evu292ISI: 000351607800005PubMedID: 25575496OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-251844DiVA: diva2:807835
Available from: 2015-04-24 Created: 2015-04-24 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Nygren, Kristiina
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Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology
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