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Malnutrition and nutritional care in an Icelandic teaching hospital
Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4820-6203
Akureyri University Hospital.
Kristianstad University, School of Health and Society, Avdelningen för Hälsovetenskap I. Kristianstad University, Research Environment PRO-CARE. Kristianstad University, Research Platform for Collaboration for Health.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2174-372X
2014 (English)In: Research, ISSN 2334-1009, no 1, 1270- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: About 30% of hospital inpatients are at undernutrition (UN) risk and it is important that sufficient nutritional treatment and care is provided in order to avoid a decline in health. Aim: To explore the prevalence of UN risk, the associations between UN-risk and other factors, and describe the nutritional treatment/care towards those at UN-risk at an Icelandic teaching hospital. An additional aim was to evaluate the user friendliness of a nutritional screening tool. Methods: Inpatients (n=56; median age 69 years; 29 women) were assessed by eight nurses using the Minimal Eating Observation and Nutrition form – version II (MEONF-II), a recently developed nursing nutritional screening tool. Results: In total 23% (n=13) were at moderate/high UN-risk. The prevalence of overweight/obesity was 57%. Among patients at UN-risk, 61% received energy dense food, oral nutritional supplements, and/or artificial nutrition; this figure was 35% among those at no/low risk. MEONF-II total scores correlated with dependency in activities of daily living (rs, 0.350), and UN-risk categories correlated with tiredness (rs, 0.426). The MEONF-II was regarded as easy to use and relevant. Conclusion: There is a need for interventions connecting the nutritional screening with individualised nutritional treatment and care in order to narrow the gap between screening and intervention. The Icelandic version of the MEONF-II is perceived as user-friendly.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. no 1, 1270- p.
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hkr:diva-13352DOI: 10.13070/rs.en.1.1270OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hkr-13352DiVA: diva2:775160
Available from: 2014-12-30 Created: 2014-12-30 Last updated: 2014-12-30Bibliographically approved

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Westergren, AlbertHagell, Peter
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