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REFLECTING ON THE DESIGN PROCESS OF AFFECTIVE HEALTH
SICS.
SICS.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0002-4825
SICS.
2011 (English)In: Proceedings of IASDR2011, the 4th World Conference on Design Research / [ed] Roozenburg, Chen and Stappers, 2011, 1-12 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We describe the design process behind a bio-sensorbased wellness-system, named Affective Health, aimed to help users to get into biofeedback loops as well as find patterns in their bodily reactions over time. By discussing details of the design process, we provide a reflected account of the particular design we arrived at. Three design qualities are used to both generate and evaluate the different design sketches. They are, in short, (1) the design must feel familiar to users, mirroring their experience of themselves, (2) creating designs that leave space for users’ own interpretation of their body data, and (3) that the modalities used in the design does not contradict one-another, but instead harmonize, helping users to make sense of the representation. The final user encounter of the Affective Health system shows that those design qualities were indeed both useful and important to users’ experience of the interaction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. 1-12 p.
Keyword [en]
Design research, design qualities, affective interaction
National Category
Design
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-158014OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-158014DiVA: diva2:773400
Conference
IASDR, 31 October - 4 november, Delft, the Netherlands
Note

QC 20141222

Available from: 2014-12-18 Created: 2014-12-18 Last updated: 2015-02-02Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Designing for Interactional Empowerment
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Designing for Interactional Empowerment
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis further defines how to reach Interactional Empowerment through design for users. Interactional Empowerment is an interaction design program within the general area of affective interaction, focusing on the users’ abil­ity to reflect, express themselves and engage in profound meaning-making.

This has been explored through design of three systems eMoto, Affective Di­ary and Affective Health, which all mirror users’ emotions or bodily reactions in interaction in some way. From these design processes and users’ encoun­ters with the system I have extracted one experiential quality, Evocative Bal­ance, and several embryos to experiential qualities. Evocative Balance refers to interaction experiences in which familiarity and resonance with lived expe­rience are balanced with suggestiveness and openness to interpretation. The development of the concept of evocative balance is reported over the course of the three significant design projects, each exploring aspects of Interaction­al Empowerment in terms of representing bodily experiences in reflective and communicative settings. By providing accounts of evocative balance in play in the three projects, analyzing a number of other relevant interaction design experiments, and discussing evocative balance in relation to existing con­cepts within affective interaction, we offer a multi-grounded construct that can be appropriated by other interaction design researchers and designers.

This thesis aims to mirror a designerly way of working, which is recognized by its multigroundedness, focus on the knowledge that resides in the design pro­cess, a slightly different approach to the view of knowledge, its extension and its rigour. It provides a background to the state-of-the-art in the design communi­ty and exemplifies these theoretical standpoints in the design processes of the three design cases. This practical example of how to extend a designer’s knowledge can work as an example for design researchers working in a similar way.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2014. x, 134 p.
Series
TRITA-CSC-A, ISSN 1653-5723 ; 2014:20
Series
SICS DISSERTATION SERIES, ISSN 1101-1335 ; 71
National Category
Design
Research subject
Human-computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-158016 (URN)978-91-7595-409-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-03-20, D2, Lindstedtsvägen 5, KTH, Stockholm, 10:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20150202

Available from: 2015-02-02 Created: 2014-12-18 Last updated: 2015-03-06Bibliographically approved

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Ståhl, AnnaHöök, KristinaKosmack-Vaara, Elsa
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Output format
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