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Debriefing in simulation conducted in small and large groups: Nursing students’ experiences
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway. (randi.tosterud@hig.no)
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences. Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3385-3731
Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health, Care and Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway.
2014 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 4, no 9, 173-182 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The debriefing phase in human patient simulation is considered to be crucial for learning. To ensure good learning conditions, the use of small groups is recommended, which poses a major challenge when the student count is high. The use of large groups may provide an alternative for typical lecture-style education and contribute to a more frequently and repeated training which is considered to be important for achieving simulation competency. The purpose of the present study was to describe nursing students’ experiences obtained during the debriefing conducted in small and large groups with the use of a qualitative descriptive approach. The informants had participated in a human patient simulation situation either in large or small groups. Data was collected through the use of five focus-group interviews and analysed by content analysis. The findings showed that independent of group-size the informants experienced the learning strategies to be unfamiliar and intrusive, and in the large groups to such an extent that learning was hampered. Debriefing was perceived as offering excellent opportunities for transferable learning, and activity, predictability and preparedness were deemed essential. Small groups provided the best learning conditions in that safety and security were ensured, but were perceived as providing limited challenges to accommodate professional requirements as a nurse. Simulation competency as a prerequisite for learning was shown not to be developed isolated in conjunction with simulation, but depends on a systematic effort to build a learning community in the programme in general. The faculty needs to support the students to be conscious and accustomed to learning as a heightened experience of learning out of their comfort zone.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sciedu Press , 2014. Vol. 4, no 9, 173-182 p.
Keyword [en]
human patient simulation, simulation competency, nursing students’ experiences
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-34604DOI: 10.5430/jnep.v4n9p173OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-34604DiVA: diva2:763449
Available from: 2014-11-14 Created: 2014-11-14 Last updated: 2017-10-31Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Simulation used as a learning approach in nursing education: Students’ experiences and validation of evaluation questionnaires
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Simulation used as a learning approach in nursing education: Students’ experiences and validation of evaluation questionnaires
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The overall aim was to investigate bachelor nursing students’ experiences with simulation as a learning approach conducted under various conditions. Additionally, the aim was to translate and validate questionnaires for the evaluation of simulation in a Norwegian context.

Methods: Quantitative and qualitative methods were used. Nursing students responded to three questionnaires after attending either low- or high-fidelity simulation. Data were analyzed with statistics (I). Two evaluation questionnaires were subjected to a principal components analysis (II, III). Data were obtained from nursing students through focus group interviews, and analyzed with a qualitative content analysis (IV).

Main findings: Independent of the fidelity level in the simulation and educational level, the students reported satisfaction and that the emphasized features in learning were present. Those who had used a paper/pencil case study were the most satisfied (I). Debriefing was reported to be crucial for learning, but in particular by attending the large groups, also as a stressful and intrusive situation (IV).The Norwegian version of the questionnaire, the Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence Scale, revealed no stable factor solution (II). The translated version of the Debriefing Experience Scale was shown to hold a good potential for evaluating debriefing, but benefited from reducing the subscales (III). To ensure safety and security were reported to be a prerequisite for learning, with the students requesting a more frequent use of simulation and a higher degree of familiarity with active learning in their program in general (IV).

Conclusions: Simulation at all fidelity levels should be used in nursing education. To exploit the potential, the learning approaches should be integrated into the program in general through a systematic and structured building of a learning community. A further validation and testing of the questionnaires in different programs and contexts is needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karlstad: Karlstads universitet, 2015. 87 p.
Series
Karlstad University Studies, ISSN 1403-8099 ; 2015:1
Keyword
debriefing, evaluation questionnaires, fidelity, nursing students, experiences, psychometric testing, simulation
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Nursing Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-34549 (URN)978-91-7063-608-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-01-23, 1 A 305, Lagerlöfsalen, Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, 11:00 (Norwegian)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2014-12-05 Created: 2014-11-05 Last updated: 2016-04-13Bibliographically approved

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Tosterud, RandiHall-Lord, Marie-LouisePetzäll, Kerstin

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