Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Universal health coverage in emerging economies: findings on health care utilization by older adults in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, the Russian Federation, and South Africa
Human Sci Res Council, Pretoria, South Africa.
Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Research Centre for Gender, Health & Ageing, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia.
Univ Newcastle, Res Ctr Gender Hlth & Ageing, Newcastle, Australia.
Show others and affiliations
2014 (English)In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 7, 25314Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]


The achievement of universal health coverage (UHC) in emerging economies is a high priority within the global community. This timely study uses standardized national population data collected from adults aged 50 and older in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, the Russian Federation, and South Africa. The objective is to describe health care utilization and measure association between inpatient and outpatient service use and patient characteristics in these six low- and middle-income countries.


Secondary analysis of data from the World Health Organization's Study on global AGEing and adult health Wave 1 was undertaken. Country samples are compared by socio-demographic characteristics, type of health care, and reasons for use. Logistic regressions describe association between socio-demographic and health factors and inpatient and outpatient service use.


In the pooled multi-country sample of over 26,000 adults aged 50-plus, who reported getting health care the last time it was needed, almost 80% of men and women received inpatient or outpatient care, or both. Roughly 30% of men and women in the Russian Federation used inpatient services in the previous 3 years and 90% of men and women in India used outpatient services in the past year. In China, public hospitals were the most frequently used service type for 52% of men and 51% of women. Multivariable regression showed that, compared with men, women were less likely to use inpatient services and more likely to use outpatient services. Respondents with two or more chronic conditions were almost three times as likely to use inpatient services and twice as likely to use outpatient services compared with respondents with no reported chronic conditions.


This study provides a basis for further investigation of country-specific responses to UHC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Järfälla: Co-Action publishing , 2014. Vol. 7, 25314
Keyword [en]
health care use utilization, low- and middle-income, universal coverage
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Environmental Health and Occupational Health
URN: urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-95977DOI: 10.3402/gha.v7.25314ISI: 000345020700001PubMedID: 25363363OAI: diva2:762090
Available from: 2014-11-10 Created: 2014-11-10 Last updated: 2016-06-15Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(258 kB)65 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 258 kBChecksum SHA-512
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Stewart Williams, Jennifer
By organisation
Epidemiology and Global Health
In the same journal
Global Health Action
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and EpidemiologyEnvironmental Health and Occupational Health

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 65 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 79 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link