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Screen-based activities and physical complaints among adolescents from the Nordic countries
Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Swedish National Institute of Health, Östersund, Sweden.
Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Research Centre for Health Promotion, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
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2010 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 10, no 324, 1-8 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

A positive association between time spent on sedentary screen-based activities and physical complaints has been reported, but the cumulative association between different types of screen-based activities and physical complaints has not been examined thoroughly.

METHODS:

The cross-sectional association between screen-based activity and physical complaints (backache and headache) among students was examined in a sample of 31022 adolescents from Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Iceland and Greenland, as part of the Health behaviour in school-aged children 2005/06 (HBSC) study. Daily hours spent on screen-based activities and levels of physical complaints were assessed using self-reports.

RESULTS:

Logistic regression analysis indicated that computer use, computer gaming and TV viewing contributed uniquely to prediction of weekly backache and headache. The magnitude of associations was consistent across types of screen based activities, and across gender.

CONCLUSION:

The observed associations indicate that time spent on screen-based activity is a contributing factor to physical complaints among young people, and that effects accumulate across different types of screen-based activities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 10, no 324, 1-8 p.
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-25127DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-10-324OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hj-25127DiVA: diva2:762006
Available from: 2014-11-10 Created: 2014-11-10 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

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