Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Bird Species in Urban and Agricultural Landscapes: Bird diversity patterns along an urbanisation gradient and crop damage caused by birds on the Deccan Plateau, India
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The major human activities that have transformed the Earth include agriculture and urbanization. The present study was conducted to contribute to a description of the effect on birds of urbanization and agriculture in an Indian region. Terrestrial bird assemblages were censused along a five-stage urbanisation gradient between January and April 2010-2013 near the city of Amravati, on the Deccan Plateau, Central India. Altogether, 89 species of birds were recorded, with the highest species richness in the rural areas (67 species) and lowest in the urban stage (29 species). The assemblages were significantly nested in all the five stages. Maximum cumulative species abundance (12 399 individuals over four years) was found in the urban stage, and was due to the constant presence of large groups of Rose-ringed Parakeets (Psittacula krameri). The lowest bird abundance was found in the industrial zone (4837 in total), where there was also a nearly two-fold decrease from 2010 to 2013. Thirty-six species demonstrated significant variation in their densities at least in one stage and between at least two months (p<0.05). Densities of 13.9% (n=5) of those species varied significantly in two stages, that of Copsychus saularis in three stages, and of Phoenicurus ochruros, in all five stages. Urban, suburban, periurban and forest stages were characterised by relatively stable species densities (significant changes observed only for 17.2% (n=5), 17.1% (n=6), 12.9% (n=7), and 17.8% (n=16) species, respectively). The additive diversity partitioning indicated that of the overall diversity (gamma-diversity), alpha diversity (within transects located within one stage) contributed 50.1% to the total diversity, and the controbution of within-stage variability was small (2.7%). Additionally, censuses on cultivated fields were taken. In two areas under mixed cropping systems, 53 bird species were identified in the two years period between June and December, 2011 and 2012. Out of the 53 detected species, only 14 were common (recorded at ≥50% of visits). Twenty-one species were recorded at Zadgaon in crops of tur (Cajanus cajan), cotton (Gossypium arboreum) and soybean (Glycine max). Nineteen species were recorded at Bhankhed in jawar (Sorghum bicolor), cotton and mung bean (Phaseolus aureus). At Zadgaon, territorial activity was observed in four species: the House Sparrow (Passer domesticus), Jungle Babbler (Turdoides striata), Yellow-eyed Babbler (Chrysomma sinense) and Red-wattled Lapwing (Vanellus indicus). The study indicated that four bird species were found under high risk, thirteen species at medium risk and eight species at low risk due to pesticide applications in croplands. The extent of crop damage in fields of groundnut, pearl millet, peas, sorghum, and sunflower was assessed by doing actual field censuses. The sustainable solution for reducing crop damage is a need for the farmers and such techniques will help to avoid direct or indirect effects of use of lethal bird control techniques on bird species diversity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2014. , x, 31, xiv p.
Series
TRITA-LWR. PHD, ISSN 1650-8602 ; 2014:08
Keyword [en]
Bird assemblage structure, Forest-urban gradient, Scale-sensitive diversity, Crop depredation, Crop damage assessment, Deccan Plateau, India.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Land and Water Resources Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-154421ISBN: 978-91-7595-321-2 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-154421DiVA: diva2:756899
Public defence
2014-11-14, Kollegiesalen, Brinellvägen 8, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden, Stockholm, 14:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20141022

Available from: 2014-10-22 Created: 2014-10-20 Last updated: 2014-10-22Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Analysis of bird assemblage structure along an urbanisation gradient in Central India
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analysis of bird assemblage structure along an urbanisation gradient in Central India
Show others...
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

We censuses terrestrial bird assemblages along a five-stage urbanisation gradient (rural forest, industrial zone, periurban, suburban, urban abitats) in and around Amravati City, Central India between January and April 2010-2013. A total of 89 species of birds were recorded, with the highest species richness in the rural areas (67 species) and lowest in the urban one (29 species). The rural habitats had the highest diversity, followed, in a decreasing order, by industrial, periurban, suburban, and urban areas, supporting the increasing disturbance hypothesis rather than the medium disturbance hypothesis. The densities were, however, highest in the urban habitats, supporting the resource concentration hypothesis. The assemblages were significantly nested.

Keyword
Bird assemblage structure, bird species diversity, bird species richness, bird species evenness, forest urban gradient, Central India.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Land and Water Resources Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-154417 (URN)
Note

QS 2014

Available from: 2014-10-20 Created: 2014-10-20 Last updated: 2014-10-22Bibliographically approved
2. The effect of urbanisation on beta diversity and functional diversity of bird assemblages in Central India
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of urbanisation on beta diversity and functional diversity of bird assemblages in Central India
Show others...
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Diversity changes can be evaluated at various spatial scales, and the relationship between changes in diversity at the local, landscape and regional scales is not evident. We evaluated overall patterns of functional and beta diversity of bird assemblages along a five-stage urbanisation gradient, censused over the months of January to April in the years 2010-2012, in and around Amravati City, Deccan Plateau, Central India. Along the urbanisation gradient, bird assemblages contained more and more small species, and the share of frugivorous and omnivorous species also increased, while that of zoophagous species decreased. Diversity partitioning indicated that of the overall pattern, local (alpha) diversity accounted for 50% of the total (gamma) diversity, and urbanisation stages another 36%; the contribution of within-stage, local diversity was rather small (2.7%), indicating fairly homogeneous assemblages.

Keyword
Aves, forest-urban gradient, scale-sensitive diversity, frugivory, omnivory, size effects, Indian Peninsula.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-154419 (URN)
Note

QS 2014

Available from: 2014-10-20 Created: 2014-10-20 Last updated: 2014-10-22Bibliographically approved
3. Cropland bird community of rain fed region in India: Abundance, activity pattern and susceptibility topesticide use
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cropland bird community of rain fed region in India: Abundance, activity pattern and susceptibility topesticide use
2013 (English)In: International Journal of Biodiversity and Conservation, ISSN 2141-243X, Vol. 5, no 10, 616-624 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The activities of cropland birds in an agricultural land are most likely unpredictable in the rain fedregion of Maharashtra, India, and therefore the exposure to risk of pesticides application by croplandbird species cannot be sufficiently categorized. The pattern of abundance, territorial, foraging and otheractivities of cropland avian species was examined at two croplands in Amravati District of MaharashtraState to distinguish the susceptibility of bird species to the application of pesticide use. Overall, 53 birdspecies were identified in the two croplands over two years period during 2011 and 2012, from June toDecember. However, out of 53 species, only 14 species were common (recorded at ≥50 of visits) in bothcroplands. Twenty-one (21) bird species were recorded at Zadgaon Cropland in crops of tur (Cajanuscajan), cotton (Gossypium arboreum) and soybean (Glycine max). Nineteen (19) bird species wererecorded at Bhankhed Cropland for more than 50% of visits in crops of jawar (Sorghum bicolor), cottonand mung (Phaseolus aureus). For Zadgaon cropland, territorial activity is most significant for fourspecies: house sparrow (Passer domesticus), jungle babbler (Turdoides striata), yellow-eyed babbler(Chrysomma sinense) and red-wattled Lapwing (Vanellus indicus). House sparrow and jungle babblerwere maximum, yellow-eyed babbler was less frequent but more than other species in the month ofJune, while red-wattled lapwing was maximum in the month of July. Foraging was the imperativeactivity for most of the species in all months: 24 to 49% of the birds in June; 41 to 61% of the birds inJuly; 63 to 90% of the birds in August; 77 to 97% of the birds in September; 57 to 97% of the birds inOctober; 66 to 98% of the birds in November and 74 to 97% of the birds in December. For Bhankhedcropland, foraging was significantly less for Ashy Prinia (Prinia socialis), Brahminy Myna (Sturniapagodarum) and Black Drongo (Dicrurus macrocercus) in the month of June. The application ofpesticides in croplands took place from June to August, which means four species were under highrisk, 13 species were at medium risk and eight species at low risk. The level and intensity of thisexposure depends on occurrence of types of species in both croplands. This study is significant torecognize crucial species that can be used for detailed study on exposure to pesticides used in cropland.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic journals, 2013
Keyword
Cropland birds, agricultural activities, risk exposure, pesticide use, India.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-127411 (URN)
Note

QC 20130830

Available from: 2013-08-29 Created: 2013-08-29 Last updated: 2017-04-28Bibliographically approved
4. Crop Depredation by Birds in Deccan Plateau, India
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Crop Depredation by Birds in Deccan Plateau, India
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Biodiversity, ISSN 2314-4149, E-ISSN 2314-4157, no 947683, 8- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Extent of crop depredation in agricultural fields of groundnut, pearl millet, peas, sorghum and sunflower was assessed in Pune, Akola and Amravati, the three productive districts of Maharashtra, India. The study included interviews with the farmers, identification of the bird species responsible for the crop depredation and actual field assessment of damage.The problem of crop depredation is severe for the crops mostly during harvesting season. Most farmers were not satisfied with the conventional bird repelling techniques. Amaximum depredation was observed by Sorghum crops by house sparrows Passer domesticus, baya weavers Ploceus philippinus, and rose-ringed parakeets Psittacula krameri, accounting to 52%of the total damage. Blue rock pigeons Columba livia damaged 42% of the peas crop (chick peas and pigeon peas), while house sparrows and baya weaver damaged the roundnut crop by 26% in the sampling plots. House sparrow Passer domesticus and baya weaver Ploceus philippinus damaged the groundnut crop in the sampling plots just after the sowing period. The sustainable solution for reducing crop depredation is a need for the farmers and also such techniques will help avoid direct or indirect effects of use of lethal bird control techniques on bird species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2014
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-150435 (URN)10.1155/2014/947683 (DOI)
Note

QC 20140908

Available from: 2014-09-04 Created: 2014-09-04 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

PhD Thesis_Manoj Ashokrao Kale(1678 kB)305 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1678 kBChecksum SHA-512
196348e45a9c446a24521c8595863326fc671d5d4140fa4223bf1b81499754525b7aca442a5ba099afe687d3b34824dea3ccf10e026e6885e873b15936ff2ace
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kale, Manoj Ashokrao
By organisation
Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering
Natural Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 305 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 349 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf