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Is "football for all" safe for all?: Cross-Sectional Study of Disparities as Determinants of 1-Year Injury Prevalence in Youth Football Programs
Linköping university.
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
Linköping university.
Karlstad University, Faculty of Health, Science and Technology (starting 2013), Department of Health Sciences.
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2012 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 8, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Football (soccer) is endorsed as a health-promoting physical activity worldwide. When football programs are introduced as part of general health promotion programs, equal access and limitation of pre-participation disparities with regard to injury risk are important. The aim of this study was to explore if disparity with regard to parents' educational level, player body mass index (BMI), and self-reported health are determinants of football injury in community-based football programs, separately or in interaction with age or gender.

Methodology/Principal Findings

Four community football clubs with 1230 youth players agreed to participate in the cross-sectional study during the 2006 season. The study constructs (parents' educational level, player BMI, and self-reported health) were operationalized into questionnaire items. The 1-year prevalence of football injury was defined as the primary outcome measure. Data were collected via a postal survey and analyzed using a series of hierarchical statistical computations investigating associations with the primary outcome measure and interactions between the study variables. The survey was returned by 827 (67.2%) youth players. The 1-year injury prevalence increased with age. For youths with parents with higher formal education, boys reported more injuries and girls reported fewer injuries than expected; for youths with lower educated parents there was a tendency towards the opposite pattern. Youths reporting injuries had higher standardized BMI compared with youths not reporting injuries. Children not reporting full health were slightly overrepresented among those reporting injuries and underrepresented for those reporting no injury.

Conclusion

Pre-participation disparities in terms of parents' educational level, through interaction with gender, BMI, and self-reported general health are associated with increased injury risk in community-based youth football. When introduced as a general health promotion, football associations should adjust community-based youth programs to accommodate children and adolescents with increased pre-participation injury risk.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Plosone.org , 2012. Vol. 7, no 8, p. 1-7
Keyword [en]
soccer, safety, injury risk, self report general health, gender, BMI
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public Health Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-33795DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0043795ISI: 000308286300091OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kau-33795DiVA: diva2:749109
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports, 2007/82
Available from: 2014-09-23 Created: 2014-09-23 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Safety promotion and injury surveillance with special focus on young people´s club sports: Challenges and possibilities
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Safety promotion and injury surveillance with special focus on young people´s club sports: Challenges and possibilities
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Physical activity in youth has many benefits, but parallel to these benefits, sport related injuries pose considerable risks.  It is important to public health to address sport related injuries, particularly those affecting young people, who comprise the majority of participants in organised sport in Sweden. 

The first study in this research showed that inspections of local sport environments, where injuries often occur, did not occur uniformly. Two additional studies pointed out the need for better surveillance of injuries, and described the use of ambulance attendance reports as a possible improvement to current surveillance systems, with a possibility to improve safety for youth and other sport participants. Two other studies identify risk factors that were specific to football and climbing sports, which can be used to guide targeted safety interventions for the young participants of these sports. 

The studies, taken as a whole, provide new information about the factors associated with sport related injuries, particularly for young people, and point out the need for better sport injury surveillance, improved inspection strategies for fields maintained by organised sport clubs in local communities, and the need to address risk factors specific to different sport activities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karlstad: Karlstad University Press, 2014. p. 83
Series
Karlstad University Studies, ISSN 1403-8099 ; 2014:61
Keyword
Climbing injury, Injury surveillance, Sport safety policies, Safety inspections, Self-reported health, Sport injury.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Public Health Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kau:diva-34429 (URN)978-91-7063-601-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-12-12, Fryxellsalen, 1B 306, Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, 09:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2014-11-17 Created: 2014-10-16 Last updated: 2014-11-18Bibliographically approved

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