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Increase in physical activity is associated with lower HbA1c levels in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: results from a cross-sectional study based on the Swedish pediatric diabetes quality registry (SWEDIABKIDS)
Linköping University.
Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
Örebro University Hospital, Sweden; Örebro University, Sweden.
Örebro University Hospital, Sweden; Örebro University, Sweden.
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2014 (English)In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 105, no 1, 119-125 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS:

To evaluate the associations between physical activity (PA) and metabolic control, measured by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), in a large group of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional analysis of data from 4655 patients, comparing HbA1c values with levels of physical activity. The data for the children and adolescents were obtained from the Swedish pediatric diabetes quality registry, SWEDIABKIDS. The patients were 7-18 years of age, had type 1 diabetes and were not in remission. Patients were grouped into five groups by frequency of PA.

RESULTS:

Mean HbA1c level was higher in the least physically active groups (PA0: 8.8% ± 1.5 (72 ± 16 mmol/mol)) than in the most physically active groups (PA4: 7.7% ± 1.0 (60 ± 11 mmol/mol)) (p<0.001). An inverse dose-response association was found between PA and HbA1c (β: -0.30, 95% CI: -0.34 to -0.26, p<0.001). This association was found in both sexes and all age groups, apart from girls aged 7-10 years. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the relationship remained significant (β: -0.21, 95% CI: -0.25 to -0.18, p<0.001) when adjusted for possible confounding factors.

CONCLUSIONS:

Physical activity seems to influence HbA1c levels in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. In clinical practice these patients should be recommended daily physical activity as a part of their treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014. Vol. 105, no 1, 119-125 p.
Keyword [en]
HbA1c; Physical activity; Metabolic control; Quality register
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109230DOI: 10.1016/j.diabres.2014.01.029ISI: 000338715400017PubMedID: 24846445OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-109230DiVA: diva2:737193
Available from: 2014-08-12 Created: 2014-08-11 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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Samuelsson, Ulf
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Linköping UniversityDivision of Clinical SciencesFaculty of Health SciencesDepartment of Paediatrics in Linköping
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