Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Vertical stratification and species composition of Nymphalidae butterfly assemblages in tree-fall gaps and understory in Madidi National Park, Bolivia
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
2014 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Rainforest is a dynamic ecosystem where species are affected by numerous biotic and abiotic factors. One important abiotic factor for many species is the availability of sunlight. The understory habitat under the closed undisturbed canopy is comparably constant with regard to sunlight and therefore also humidity and temperature. The canopy regulates the amount of sunlight that will reach the ground, which means that changes in canopy cover will change the understory environment. The main natural disturbances that affect the structure of rainforest are tree falls, that resulting in tree-fall gaps. The aim of this study was to compare the vertical stratification and species composition of fruit-feeding Nymphalidae butterflies between tree-fall gaps of different sizes and undisturbed understory in a primary rainforest in Madidi National Park, Bolivia. Fruit-baited traps were suspended at ground level (2 m) and in canopy (10-15 m) in 5 tree-fall gaps and adjacent undisturbed understory, a total of 40 traps. There were more species rich assemblages in gaps both at ground level and in canopy, compared to understory. The data show that there are different species assemblages in tree-fall gaps, undisturbed understory, canopy and at ground level. The vegetation structure affected by the amount of sun light was an important factor affecting butterfly assemblages. There was a tendency that differences among gap assemblages increased with gap size. These results indicate the importance of the mosaic pattern caused by natural tree-fall gaps, they contain specific resources that favor different butterfly assemblages.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. , 18 p.
Keyword [en]
Amazonas, gap dynamics, vertical stratification, tree fall gap, Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Madidi National Park
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-108770ISRN: LiTH-IFM- Ex--14/2883--SEOAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-108770DiVA: diva2:732380
Subject / course
Biology
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2014-08-13 Created: 2014-07-03 Last updated: 2014-08-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(914 kB)311 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 914 kBChecksum SHA-512
6875856bc47a9519b5ca0989335ea6b874a0002849cfd93f93f0587b684c608d1e4ff1476dcc049a3b1743a189966a587279acc05bc1cbf572b5f4b9a4fe0c8b
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Skarped, Linnéa
By organisation
Department of Physics, Chemistry and BiologyThe Institute of Technology
Natural Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 311 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 133 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf