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Income-related inequalities in self-raported health across 29 European countries: Findings from the European Social Survey
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
2014 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Background: The degree of health variation among social groups is an important indicator of population health and the efficiency of economic and social systems. Previous studies revealed existence of health inequalities across Europe, however recent studies on the contribution of income to such inequalities are scarce.

Aim: To investigate differences in self-reported health between the lowest and the highest income groups across Europe.

Method: Data from the European Social Survey for 29 countries were examined. The absolute inequalities were calculated as differences in age-adjusted prevalence of poor self-reported health between the lowest and the highest income quintiles. The relative inequalities were measured by odds ratios for reporting poor health in the lowest income group compared to the highest one.

Results: Income-related health inequalities were found in all countries. Larger relative inequalities among men were observed in Greece, Kosovo, Ireland, Israel, Iceland, and Slovenia; among women – in Lithuania, Denmark, Norway, Portugal, Cyprus, and Czech Republic.

Conslusions: In Europe, income-related health inequalities persist, however, their degree varies across countries. Gender differences in income-related inequalities were observed within certain countries. For a comprehensive description of health situation in a country assessing both the prevalence of poor health and the inequality level is crucial. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. , 54 p.
Keyword [en]
self-reported health, inequalities, income, health inequities, Europe
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-104779OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-104779DiVA: diva2:726541
Presentation
2014-06-04, 09:00 (English)
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Available from: 2014-06-19 Created: 2014-06-18 Last updated: 2014-06-19Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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