Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Response to a social dilemma: an analysis of the choice between an economic and an environmental optimum in a policy making context
Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Transport economics Borlänge.
Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Transport economics Stockholm.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7976-5628
Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Society, environment and transport, Transport economics Stockholm.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7864-5982
2014 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Many countries have begun to require benefit-cost analysis as a way of informing key regulatory decisions. However, its actual use seem to be limited, especially in the area of environmental, health, and safety regulation. Reasons for this seem to be lack of knowledge and experience among decision makers and that established quality objectives prevent the use of this type of analysis and deliberation. We present the results from an experiment designed to investigate choice behavior in a public sector context. Students with different academic majors were asked to act as decision makers. There were two choice situations: one in a municipality deciding on an action plan and one in a government agency having to propose a national limit value. In both settings, the outcome that would pass a benefit-cost test would not achieve a natural state of the environment, hence a social dilemma choice situation. We find that a majority of the respondents prefer outcomes that can be considered environmental “optimum” but that there is a difference depending on academic major. The choice context also influences the response behavior and so does the information about an international standard. The latter increases the likelihood to accept alternatives that imply higher costs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Centre for Transport Studies , 2014. , 32 p.
Series
CTS Working Paper, 2014:8
Keyword [en]
Cost benefit analysis, Policy, Decision process, Choice, Local authority, Government (national), Willingness to pay
National Category
Economics Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use Public Administration Studies
Research subject
SAB, Uh Environmental protection and nature conservation; 10 Road: Transport, society, policy and planning
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:vti:diva-6889OAI: oai:DiVA.org:vti-6889DiVA: diva2:716738
Available from: 2014-05-12 Created: 2014-05-12 Last updated: 2017-02-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(877 kB)