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Plasma Levels of S100B in Preeclampsia and Association With Possible Central Nervous System Effects
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. (Obstetrisk forskning/Högberg)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. (Gynekologisk endokrinologi/Naessén)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. (Obstetrisk forskning/Högberg)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Radiology.
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2014 (English)In: American Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0895-7061, E-ISSN 1941-7225, Vol. 27, no 8, 1105-1111 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

S100B is supposed to be a peripheral biomarker of central nervous system (CNS) injury. The purpose of this study was to compare levels of S100B in women with preeclampsia with levels in healthy pregnant control subjects and furthermore to analyze levels of S100B in relation to possible CNS effects.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional case-control study in antenatal care centers in Uppsala, Sweden, was performed. Fifty-three women with preeclampsia and 58 healthy pregnant women were recruited at similar gestational length; women with preeclampsia were recruited at time of diagnosis, and control subjects were recruited during their routine visit to an antenatal clinic. Plasma samples were collected, and levels of S100B were analyzed with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Information about demographic and clinical characteristics, including symptoms related to CNS affection, was collected from the medical records. The main outcome measures were plasma levels of S100B and possible CNS effects.

RESULTS:

Levels of S100B were significantly higher among women with preeclampsia than among control subjects (0.12 µg/L vs. 0.07 µg/L; P < 0.001). In preeclampsia, there was a significant association between high levels of S100B and visual disturbances (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

S100B is increased among women with preeclampsia, and high levels of S100B associate with visual disturbances, which might reflect CNS affection in women with preeclampsia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 27, no 8, 1105-1111 p.
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-221882DOI: 10.1093/ajh/hpu020ISI: 000342237900022PubMedID: 24610883OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-221882DiVA: diva2:710315
Available from: 2014-04-07 Created: 2014-04-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Cerebral biomarkers in women with preeclampsia
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cerebral biomarkers in women with preeclampsia
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Preeclampsia and eclampsia are among the most common causes of maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity worldwide. There are no reliable means to predict eclampsia or cerebral edema in women with preeclampsia and knowledge of the brain involvement in preeclampsia is still limited. S100B and neuron specific enolase (NSE) are two cerebral biomarkers of glial- and neuronal origin respectively. They are used as predictors for neurological outcome after traumatic brain injuries and cardiac arrest but have not yet been investigated in preeclampsia.

This thesis is based on one longitudinal cohort study of pregnant women (n=469, Paper I and III), one cross sectional study of women with preeclampsia and women with normal pregnancies (n=53 and 58 respectively, Paper II and IV) and one experimental animal study of eclampsia (Paper V).

In Paper I and III, plasma concentrations of S100B and NSE were investigated throughout pregnancy in women developing preeclampsia (n=16) and in women with normal pregnancies (n=36) in a nested case control study. Plasma concentrations were increased in women developing preeclampsia in gestational week 33 and 37 for S100B and in gestational week 37 for NSE compared to women with normal pregnancies.

In Paper II and IV, increased plasma concentrations of S100B and NSE were confirmed among women with preeclampsia compared to women with normal pregnancies. Furthermore, increased plasma concentrations of S100B correlated to visual disturbances among women with preeclampsia (Paper II) and plasma concentrations of S100B and NSE remained increased among women with preeclampsia one year after delivery (Paper IV).

In Paper V, an experimental rat model of preeclampsia and eclampsia demonstrated increased serum concentrations of S100B after seizures in normal pregnancy (n=5) and a tendency towards increased plasma concentrations of S100B in preeclampsia (n=5) compared to normal pregnancy (n=5) without seizures. Furthermore, after seizures, animals with magnesium sulphate treatment demonstrated increased serum concentrations of S100B and NSE compared to no treatment.

In conclusion; plasma concentrations of S100B and NSE are increased in preeclampsia during late pregnancy and postpartum and S100B correlates to visual disturbances in women with preeclampsia. The findings are partly confirmed in an animal model of eclampsia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2017. 98 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 1364
Keyword
preeclampsia, eclampsia, biomarkers, S100B, NSE, PRES
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Research subject
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-322780 (URN)978-91-513-0057-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-10-20, Gustavianum, Auditorium Minus, Akademigatan 3, 753 10 Uppsala, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-09-28 Created: 2017-09-01 Last updated: 2017-10-18

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Bergman, LinaAkhter, TansimWikström, Anna-KarinWikström, JohanNaessén, TordÅkerud, Helena

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