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Evaluation of pain and function after two home exercise programs in a clinical trial on women with chronic neck pain - with special emphasises on completers and responders
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
Finnish Institute Occupat Heatlh, Finland .
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
2014 (English)In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 15, no 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Different types of exercises can help manage chronic neck pain. Supervised exercise interventions are widely used, but these protocols require substantial resources. The aim of this trial, which focused on adherence, was to evaluate two home exercise interventions. Methods: This parallel group randomized controlled trial included 57 women randomly allocated into two groups - a strength training group (STRENGTH, 34 subjects) and a stretching group (STRETCH, 23 subjects). The interventions focused on the neck and shoulder muscles and lasted for 12 months. The STRENGTH group performed weight training and ended each session with stretching exercises. These stretching exercises constituted the entirety of the STRETCH groups training session. Both groups were instructed to exercise three times per week. All the participants kept an exercise diary. In addition, all participants were offered support via phone and e-mail. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and function. The trial included a four-to six-month and a twelve-month follow-up. A completer in this study exercised at least 1,5 times per week during eight unbroken weeks. A responder in this study reported clinically significant improvements on pain and function. The statistical analyses used the Mann Whitney U-test, Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and X-2 test. Results: At four-to six-months, the numbers of completers were 19 in the STRENGTH group and 17 in the STRETCH group. At twelve months, the corresponding numbers were 11 (STRENGTH) and 10 (STRETCH). At four-to six-months, the proportions of subjects reporting clinically important changes (STRENGTH and STRETCH) were for neck pain: 47% and 41%, shoulder pain: 47% and 47%, function: 37% and 29%. At twelve months, the corresponding numbers were for neck pain: 45% and 40%, shoulder pain: 55% and 50%, function: 55% and 20%. Conclusions: No differences in the two primary outcomes between the two interventions were found, a finding that may be due to the insufficient statistical power of the study. Both interventions based on home exercises improved the two primary outcomes, but the adherences were relatively low. Future studies should investigate ways to improve adherence to home exercise treatments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central , 2014. Vol. 15, no 6
Keyword [en]
Neck pain; Shoulder pain; Home exercise; Strength training; Stretching; Function
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104117DOI: 10.1186/1471-2474-15-6ISI: 000329854700003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-104117DiVA: diva2:694688
Available from: 2014-02-07 Created: 2014-02-07 Last updated: 2017-12-06
In thesis
1. Chronic Pain and Exercise: Studies on pain intensity, biochemistry, adherence and attitudes
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chronic Pain and Exercise: Studies on pain intensity, biochemistry, adherence and attitudes
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Chronic pain is common in western countries and entails considerable consequences for the afflicted individuals as well as for the society. Furthermore, chronic pain is complex including an advanced interplay between biological-, psychological- and social aspects. Treatment of chronic pain attempts to decrease pain intensity and increase physical-, psychological- and social functioning. However, the treatment of chronic pain is still not optimized. Different types of physical activity and exercise (PA&E) are commonly applied as non-pharmacological treatment strategies for chronic pain, but the most efficient type and dose of PA&E are unclear. In addition, adherence to prescribed PA&E is often troublesome, which further complicates the application of PA&E as treatment for chronic pain.

The aim of this thesis is to increase the knowledge about PA&E as treatment for chronic pain regarding pain intensity, biochemical substances, adherence and attitudes.

The findings of this thesis were that a long-term, home-based PA&E intervention comprising strength exercises as well as stretch exercises decreased pain intensity and increased function in women with chronic neck- and shoulder pain. Using microdialysis technique, differences in pain modulatory biochemical substances were found, before the intervention, in painful trapezius muscle compared to pain-free trapezius muscle. In addition, alterations in pain modulatory substances in painful trapezius muscle after the intervention were found, which possibly could imply peripheral physiological effects of PA&E. Furthermore, psychological factors could be associated to the effects of and adherence to the PA&E intervention. An intention to be physically active were expressed by patients with chronic pain, but a discordance between the intention and PA&E-behaviour were evident, even though the PA&E were experienced as valuable.

In conclusion, this thesis strengthens the importance of PA&E as treatment for chronic pain. Especially, this thesis increases the knowledge about; possible peripheral pain inhibitory effects after long-term exercise; how psychological factors might affect the results of PA&E; and also about important behavioural aspects that might affect adherence to prescribed PA&E. This thesis highlights the need of more research on physiological pain inhibitory effects of long-term PA&E in chronic pain. Furthermore, improved methods for ensured adherence to prescribed PA&E are necessary in order to optimize the effect of PA&E as treatment for chronic pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2017. 96 p.
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1575
Keyword
Adherence, biochemical substances, chronic pain, physical activity and exercise, treatment
National Category
Physiotherapy Orthopedics Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-137076 (URN)10.3384/diss.diva-137076 (DOI)9789176855188 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-06-02, Berzeliussalen, Campus US, Linköping, 09:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-05-04 Created: 2017-05-04 Last updated: 2017-05-05Bibliographically approved

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