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Experienced Barriers to Lean in Swedish Manufacturing and Health Care
University of Gävle, Center for Logistics and Innovative Production. University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Industrial Development, IT and Land Management. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. County Council of Gävleborg.
2013 (English)In: International Journal of Lean Thinking, ISSN 2146-0337, Vol. 4, no 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A B S T R A C T  

Purpose: The purpose is to compare similarities and divergences in how the concepts of Lean and barriers to Lean are described by key informants at a production unit in a large manufacturing company and two emergency health care units in Sweden.

Design/methodology/approach: Data was collected via semi-structured interviews and analyzed with the constant comparative method (CCM) and Porras and Robertson’s

(1992) change model.

Findings: In both organizations, the view of Lean changed from a toolbox to a human behavior view. Eight barriers were experienced in both organizations. Three barriers

were unique to manufacturing or to health care, respectively. Nine barriers were elements of social factors;five were elements of organizing arrangements.

Research limitations/implications: Only people practically involved and responsible for the implementation at the two organizations participated in the study.

Practical implications: Persons responsible for implementing Lean should consider organizational arrangements and social factors in order to limit barriers to

successful implementation.

Originality/value: Most research on Lean has been about successful Lean implementations. This study focuses on how Lean is viewed and what barriers personnel in

manufacturing and health care have experienced. In comparing the barriers to Lean experienced in the two groups, common, archetypical, and unique barriers for manufacturing and health care can be identified, thus contributing to knowledge about barriers to Lean implementation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 4, no 2
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-16117OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-16117DiVA: diva2:689521
Available from: 2014-01-21 Created: 2014-01-21 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Lean Implementation: the significance of people and dualism
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lean Implementation: the significance of people and dualism
2013 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Lean, with its origins at the Toyota Motor Company, is a concept that is known to increase effectiveness in manufacturing. The Lean concept is now argued to be relevant not only in manufacturing but in service and health-care delivery as well. The reported results of Lean implementation efforts are divided. There are reports that most of the Lean implementation efforts are not reaching the goal; on the other hand, there are reports of promising results. The divided results from Lean implementation efforts show how important it is to research and identify factors that are barriers to successful implementation of Lean. This thesis aims to contribute knowledge about barriers to Lean implementation by collecting empirical findings from manufacturing and health care and structuring the perceived barriers and difficulties to Lean implementation. My first study aimed to compare similarities and divergences in barriers to Lean described by key informants in manufacturing and health care. The data was collected via semi-structured interviews. Findings showed that the perceived difficulties and barriers are much the same in manufacturing and health care. The second study was a case study at a manufacturing firm, researching how the views on Lean of the managers implementing Lean influence its implementation. Data was collected via semi-structured interviews with 20 individuals and covered all hierarchical management levels in the company. Findings showed that managers' views on Lean influence the implementation but also that learning during the implementation process can alter managers' views of Lean. The third study aimed to research how management of Lean is described in the literature. This was done through a literature review. The findings showed that Lean management is a matter of dualism, consisting of two complementary systems of action, management and leadership, which are related to the two basic principles of Lean, continuous improvement and respect for the people.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2013. 73 p.
Series
TRITA-STH : report, ISSN 1653-3836 ; 2013:8
Keyword
Lean, leadership, management, implementation, barriers, comparison, development, health care, manufacturing
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-16133 (URN)978-91-7501-908-6 (ISBN)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2014-01-21 Created: 2014-01-21 Last updated: 2017-10-20Bibliographically approved

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