Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Detecting ligand interactions with G protein-coupled receptors in real-time on living cells
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Preclinical PET Platform.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6120-2683
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Biomedical Radiation Sciences.
Show others and affiliations
2013 (English)In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 441, no 4, 820-824 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large group of receptors of great biological and clinical relevance. Despite this, the tools for a detailed analysis of ligand-GPCR interactions are limited. The aim of this paper was to demonstrate how ligand binding to GPCRs can be followed in real-time on living cells. This was conducted using two model systems, the radiolabeled porcine peptide YY (pPYY) interacting with transfected human Y2 receptor (hY2R) and the bombesin antagonist RM26 binding to the naturally expressed gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR). By following the interaction over time, the affinity and kinetic properties such as association and dissociation rate were obtained. Additionally, data were analyzed using the Interaction Map method, which can evaluate a real-time binding curve and present the number of parallel interactions contributing to the curve. It was found that pPYY binds very slowly with an estimated time to equilibrium of approximately 12 h. This may be problematic in standard end-point assays where equilibrium is required. The RM26 binding showed signs of heterogeneity, observed as two parallel interactions with unique kinetic properties. In conclusion, measuring binding in real-time using living cells opens up for a better understanding of ligand interactions with GPCRs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 441, no 4, 820-824 p.
Keyword [en]
GPCR, Real-time, LigandTracer, Interaction Map, Kinetics, Heterogeneity
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-215943DOI: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2013.10.149ISI: 000328434800022OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-215943DiVA: diva2:688817
Note

De två första författarna delar första författarskapet.

Available from: 2014-01-17 Created: 2014-01-17 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Bombesin Antagonists for Targeting Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor-Positive Tumors: Design, Synthesis, Preclinical Evaluation and Optimization of Imaging Agents
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bombesin Antagonists for Targeting Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor-Positive Tumors: Design, Synthesis, Preclinical Evaluation and Optimization of Imaging Agents
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis is focused on the development, preclinical evaluation, and optimization of radiotracers for the detection of gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR)-expressing tumors. The work is divided into three distinct parts: (1) the development of bombesin (BN) antagonist (RM26)-based imaging radiotracers for the detection of GRPR-expressing tumors using different positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radionuclides (68Ga, 18F and 111In), (2) the establishment of a method to monitor the ligand-G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) interaction in real time without requiring purification and stabilization of the receptors, and (3) the evaluation of radiopeptide structure-related factors (length of mini-PEG linker and composition of chelator for metal labeling) affecting the in vitro and in vivo characteristics of RM26-based tracers.

We demonstrated the possibility of high-contrast in vivo imaging of GRPR-expressing xenografts despite the physiological expression of GRPR in abdominal organs. Fast radioactivity clearance from the blood and healthy organs, including receptor-positive organs, and long retention in the tumors resulted in high tumor-to-background ratios. A novel real-time assay for measuring the kinetics of the radiotracers targeting GPCR was evaluated. Living cells were used instead of purified receptors in this technology, bringing the developmental work one step closer to the true target environment (imaging in living systems). The comparative study of 68Ga-labeled NOTA-PEGn-RM26 with di-, tri-, tetra- and hexaethylene glycol chains demonstrated that the addition of only a few units of ethylene glycol to the spacer is insufficient to appreciably affect the biodistribution of the radiopeptide. Finally, a comparative study of 68Ga-labeled PEG2-RM26 analogs N-terminally conjugated to NOTA, NODAGA, DOTA or DOTAGA highlighted the influence of the chelator on the targeting properties of the radiopeptide.

The main conclusion that can be drawn from this thesis is that 68Ga-NOTA-PEG2-RM26 has favorable biodistribution properties, such as rapid clearance from blood and tissues with physiological GRPR expression levels and long retention in GRPR-expressing tumors, and that this radiopeptide is potentially suitable for initial clinical investigation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2014. 66 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Pharmacy, ISSN 1651-6192 ; 191
Keyword
Bombesin, Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR), Antagonist, Radionuclide molecular imaging
National Category
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-232123 (URN)978-91-554-9039-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-10-31, Rudbecksalen, Dag Hammarskjölds väg 20, Uppsala, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2014-10-10 Created: 2014-09-12 Last updated: 2015-01-23
2. Evolutionary and Pharmacological Studies of NPY and QRFP Receptors
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evolutionary and Pharmacological Studies of NPY and QRFP Receptors
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The neuropeptide Y (NPY) system consists of 3-4 peptides and 4-7 receptors in vertebrates. It has powerful effects on appetite regulation and is involved in many other biological processes including blood pressure regulation, bone formation and anxiety. This thesis describes studies of the evolution of the NPY system by comparison of several vertebrate species and structural studies of the human Y2 receptor, which reduces appetite, to identify amino acid residues involved in peptide-receptor interactions.

The NPY system was studied in zebrafish (Danio rerio), western clawed frog (Xenopus tropicalis), and sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). The receptors were cloned and functionally expressed and their pharmacological profiles were determined using the native peptides in either binding studies or a signal transduction assay. Some peptide-receptor preferences were observed, indicating functional specialization.

A receptor family closely related to the NPY receptors, called the QRFP receptors, was investigated. A QRFP receptor was cloned from amphioxus, Branchistoma floridae, showing that the receptor arose before the origin of the vertebrates. Evolutionary studies demonstrated that the ancestral vertebrate had as many as four QRFP receptors, only one of which remains in mammals today. This correlates with the NPY receptor family, located in the same chromosomal regions, which had seven members in the ancestral vertebrate but only 4-5 in living mammals. Some vertebrates have considerably more complex NPY and QRFP receptor systems than humans and other mammals.

Two studies investigated interactions of NPY-family peptides with the human Y2 receptor. Candidate residues, selected based on structural modeling and docking, were mutated to disrupt possible interactions with peptide ligands. The modified receptors were expressed in cultured cells and investigated by measuring binding and functional responses. Several receptor residues were found to influence peptide-receptor interactions, some of which are involved in maintaining receptor structure. In a pilot study, the kinetics of peptide-receptor interaction were found to be very slow, of the order several hours.

In conclusion, this thesis clarifies evolutionary relationships for the complex NPY and QRFP peptide-receptor systems and improves the structural models of the human NPY-family receptors, especially Y2. These results will hopefully facilitate drug design for targeting of NPY-family receptors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala, Sweden: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2014. 59 p.
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Medicine, ISSN 1651-6206 ; 1040
Keyword
Neuropeptide Y, genome duplication, Evolution, vertebrate, Pharmacology, Modelling, Kinetics
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Pharmacology and Toxicology Cell and Molecular Biology Neurosciences Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Cell Biology Structural Biology
Research subject
Bioinformatics; Biology with specialization in Evolutionary Genetics; Biology with specialization in Evolutionary Functional Genomics; Pharmaceutical Pharmacology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-233461 (URN)978-91-554-9059-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-11-21, C2, 305, Husargatan 3, BMC, Uppsala, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2014-10-31 Created: 2014-10-06 Last updated: 2015-02-02

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(1158 kB)172 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1158 kBChecksum SHA-512
8842f4e5d1447495a17ce2e4ed6793bbbd06024bd51df7f2d89b970bee955b476a1fa00d17196f650a02cade20887f3b6c6e54d37731843e5badcf9cd62bc329
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Xu, BoVarasteh, ZohrehOrlova, AnnaAndersson, KarlLarhammar, DanBjörkelund, Hanna
By organisation
PharmacologyPreclinical PET PlatformBiomedical Radiation Sciences
In the same journal
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 172 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 733 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf