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Analysis of radiocarbon, stable isotopes and DNA in teeth to facilitate identification of unknown decedents
Division of Forensic Medicine, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Department of Legal Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan.
Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California, USA.
Institut Camille Jordan, University of Lyon, Villeurbanne, France.
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2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 7, e69597- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The characterization of unidentified bodies or suspected human remains is a frequent and important task for forensic investigators. However, any identification method requires clues to the person’s identity to allow for comparisons with missing persons. If such clues are lacking, information about the year of birth, sex and geographic origin of the victim, is particularly helpful to aid in the identification casework and limit the search for possible matches. We present here results of stable isotope analysis of 13C and 18O, and bomb-pulse 14C analyses that can help in the casework. The 14C analysis of enamel provided information of the year of birth with an average absolute error of 1.8±1.3 years. We also found that analysis of enamel and root from the same tooth can be used to determine if the 14C values match the rising or falling part of the bomb-curve. Enamel laydown times can be used to estimate the date of birth of individuals, but here we show that this detour is unnecessary when using a large set of crude 14C data of tooth enamel as a reference. The levels of 13C in tooth enamel were higher in North America than in teeth from Europe and Asia, and Mexican teeth showed even higher levels than those from USA. DNA analysis was performed on 28 teeth, and provided individual-specific profiles in most cases and sex determination in all cases. In conclusion, these analyses can dramatically limit the number of possible matches and hence facilitate person identification work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 8, no 7, e69597- p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-99820DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0069597ISI: 000323369700052PubMedID: 23922751OAI: diva2:658295
Available from: 2013-10-21 Created: 2013-10-21 Last updated: 2013-12-28

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Holmlund, Gunilla
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