Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Markers of Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity in Children with Autism
Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, USA.
Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, USA.
Kimball Genetics, a Division of LabCorp, Denver, Colorado, USA.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Reproduktiv hälsa/Sundström Poromaa)
Show others and affiliations
2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 6, e66155- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Gastrointestinal symptoms are a common feature in children with autism, drawing attention to a potential association with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. However, studies to date regarding the immune response to gluten in autism and its association with celiac disease have been inconsistent. The aim of this study was to assess immune reactivity to gluten in pediatric patients diagnosed with autism according to strict criteria and to evaluate the potential link between autism and celiac disease. Methods: Study participants included children (with or without gastrointestinal symptoms) diagnosed with autism according to both the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) and the Autism Diagnostic Interview, Revised (ADIR) (n = 37), their unaffected siblings (n = 27), and age-matched healthy controls (n = 76). Serum specimens were tested for antibodies to native gliadin, deamidated gliadin, and transglutaminase 2 (TG2). Affected children were genotyped for celiac disease associated HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 alleles. Results: Children with autism had significantly higher levels of IgG antibody to gliadin compared with unrelated healthy controls (p<0.01). The IgG levels were also higher compared to the unaffected siblings, but did not reach statistical significance. The IgG anti-gliadin antibody response was significantly greater in the autistic children with gastrointestinal symptoms in comparison to those without them (p<0.01). There was no difference in IgA response to gliadin across groups. The levels of celiac disease-specific serologic markers, i.e., antibodies to deamidated gliadin and TG2, did not differ between patients and controls. An association between increased anti-gliadin antibody and presence of HLA-DQ2 and/or -DQ8 was not observed. Conclusions: A subset of children with autism displays increased immune reactivity to gluten, the mechanism of which appears to be distinct from that in celiac disease. The increased anti-gliadin antibody response and its association with GI symptoms points to a potential mechanism involving immunologic and/or intestinal permeability abnormalities in affected children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 8, no 6, e66155- p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-205016DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0066155ISI: 000320576400059OAI: diva2:640488
Available from: 2013-08-13 Created: 2013-08-13 Last updated: 2014-03-12Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(282 kB)187 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 282 kBChecksum SHA-512
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hellberg, Dan
By organisation
Center for Clinical Research DalarnaDepartment of Women's and Children's Health
In the same journal
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 187 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 251 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link