Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A laboratory device for developing analysis tools and methods for gamma emission tomography of nuclear fuel
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3136-5665
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5133-6829
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
2013 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Tomography is a measurement technique that images the inner parts of objects using only external measurement. It is widely used within the field of medicine, and may become important also for nuclear fuel verification where inspectors can obtain information from fuel assemblies’ inner sections without dismantling them.

At Uppsala University, Sweden, a laboratory device has been built for investigating the tomographic measurement techniques on nuclear fuel. The device is composed of machinery to position model fuelrods, activated with Cs-137, in a fuel assembly pattern according to the user's choice. The gamma radiation from the model fuel assembly is collimated to a set of detectors that record the radiation intensity in various positions around the fuel model. Reconstruction of the gamma activity distribution within the fuel model is performed off-line.

The objective for constructing the laboratory device was to support the development of tomographic techniques for nuclear fuel diagnostics as well as for nuclear safeguards purposes. The device allows for evaluating the performance of different data-acquisition setups, measurement schemes and reconstruction algorithms, since the activity content of each fuel rod is well known.

For safeguards purposes, the device is unique in its capability to model various fuel geometries and configurations of partial defects. The latter includes removed, empty and substituted fuel rods. It is well suited for developing tomographic techniques that are optimized for partial defect detection. It also allows for development of analysis tools necessary to quantify detection limits.

Here, we describe the capabilities of the laboratory device and elaborate on how the device may be used to support the nuclear safeguards community with the development of unattended gamma emission tomography.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013.
Keyword [en]
safeguards, gamma emission tomography, nuclear fuel, partial defect, tomographic algorithms
National Category
Subatomic Physics
Research subject
Applied Nuclear Physics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-200707OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-200707DiVA, id: diva2:624727
Conference
The 35th ESARDA Annual Meeting
Available from: 2013-06-03 Created: 2013-06-03 Last updated: 2018-04-19

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Jansson, PeterGrape, SophieJacobsson Svärd, StaffanHåkansson, Ane
By organisation
Applied Nuclear Physics
Subatomic Physics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 1043 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf