Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The relationship between building design and residents’ quality of life in extra care housing schemes
Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8795-7555
Show others and affiliations
2013 (English)In: Health and Place, ISSN 1353-8292, E-ISSN 1873-2054, Vol. 21, p. 52-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Well-designed housing is recognised as being an important factor in promoting a good quality of life. Specialised housing models incorporating care services, such as extra care housing (ECH) schemes are seen as enabling older people to maintain a good quality of life despite increasing health problems that can accompany ageing. Despite the variation in ECH building design little is known about the impact of ECH building design on the quality of life of building users. The evaluation of older people’s living environments (EVOLVE) study collected cross-sectional data on building design and quality of life in 23 ECH schemes in England, UK. Residents’ quality of life was assessed using the schedule for the evaluation of individual quality of life-direct weighting (SEIQoL-DW) and on the four domains of control, autonomy, self-realisation and pleasure on the CASP-19. Building design was measured on 12 user-related domains by means of a new tool; the EVOLVE tool. Using multilevel linear regression, significant associations were found between several aspects of building design and quality of life. Furthermore, there was evidence that the relationship between building design and quality of life was partly mediated by the dependency of participants and scheme size (number of living units). Our findings suggest that good quality building design in ECH can support the quality of life of residents, but that designing features that support the needs of both relatively independent and frail users is problematic, with the needs of highly dependent users not currently supported as well as could be hoped by ECH schemes. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 21, p. 52-64
Keywords [en]
architectural design; housing conditions; multiple regression; quality of life; residential development, aged; aging; article; cross-sectional study; female; housing; human; male; personal autonomy; pleasure; priority journal; quality control; quality of life; resident; social interaction; United Kingdom; urban rural difference
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Hälsa och välfärd
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:du-12198DOI: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2012.12.004ISI: 000317266200007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:du-12198DiVA, id: diva2:620392
Available from: 2013-05-08 Created: 2013-05-08 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
McKee, Kevin
By organisation
Social Work
In the same journal
Health and Place
Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 581 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf