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High-throughput hyperdimensional vertebrate phenotyping
Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Visual Information and Interaction. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction.
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2013 (English)In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 4, p. 1467-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most gene mutations and biologically active molecules cause complex responses in animals that cannot be predicted by cell culture models. Yet animal studies remain too slow and their analyses are often limited to only a few readouts. Here we demonstrate high-throughput optical projection tomography with micrometre resolution and hyperdimensional screening of entire vertebrates in tens of seconds using a simple fluidic system. Hundreds of independent morphological features and complex phenotypes are automatically captured in three dimensions with unprecedented speed and detail in semitransparent zebrafish larvae. By clustering quantitative phenotypic signatures, we can detect and classify even subtle alterations in many biological processes simultaneously. We term our approach hyperdimensional in vivo phenotyping. To illustrate the power of hyperdimensional in vivo phenotyping, we have analysed the effects of several classes of teratogens on cartilage formation using 200 independent morphological measurements, and identified similarities and differences that correlate well with their known mechanisms of actions in mammals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 4, p. 1467-
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Natural Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-199556DOI: 10.1038/ncomms2475ISI: 000316616400037OAI: oai:DiVA.org:uu-199556DiVA, id: diva2:620062
Available from: 2013-05-07 Created: 2013-05-07 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Wählby, Carolina
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Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLabDivision of Visual Information and InteractionComputerized Image Analysis and Human-Computer Interaction
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