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On the change of preferential growth orientation in chemical vapor deposition of titanium carbide by aromatic hydrocarbon precursors
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7171-5383
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5341-2637
2013 (English)In: Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology. A. Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films, ISSN 0734-2101, E-ISSN 1520-8559, Vol. 31, no 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Thin films of titanium carbide grown by chemical vapor deposition exhibit a strong preferential (111) growth direction if aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, are used as a carbon precursor. If aliphatic hydrocarbons such as methane are used, growth on the (100) surface is preferred. In this study, quantum chemical computations are used to study the adsorption of benzene and methane on the (100) and (111) surfaces to provide an explanation for the changed growth behavior. The adsorption energy of benzene is found to be approximately twice as high on the (111) surface as compared to the (100) surface, and adsorption studies further suggest that benzene chemisorbs on the (111) surface, while it physisorbs on the (100) surface. The studies reveal no significant differences in adsorption energy or behavior for methane on the two surfaces. The authors propose that the higher benzene adsorption energy and different adsorption behavior on the (111) surface are the explanations for the preferential growth orientation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Vacuum Society , 2013. Vol. 31, no 2
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Engineering and Technology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-90672DOI: 10.1116/1.4792723ISI: 000315595700024OAI: oai:DiVA.org:liu-90672DiVA: diva2:614197
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council (VR)||

Available from: 2013-04-04 Created: 2013-04-03 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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