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Musicking: Kreativ improvisation i förskolan
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
2013 (Swedish)Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Abstract

 

 

 

Musicking: Creative improvisation in preschool

(Musicking: Kreativ improvisation i förskolan)

 

This thesis draws on a video ethnography of music activities in a preschool setting in Sweden. It focuses on the participants’ co-construction of music activities and on their use of semiotic and material resources to constitute and sustain these activities. The videos document musicking (Small, 1998), that is, events involving a series of musical activities: work with instruments, dancing and movements, singing and listening.

The data were collected during one year and includes 24 hours of video films (altogether 30 musicking events). The participants in the study are 1-3 years old children and their music pedagogues (preschool staff members who worked in the preschool on a daily basis).

In terms of theoretical influence, the study is inspired by conversation analysis (Sacks, 1992), linguistic anthropology and work on aesthetic processes (Duranti & Black, 2012; Sawyer, 1997; 2003), as well as sociocultural theorizing (Lave, 1996; Rogoff, 1995; Wenger, 1998).

The findings show that the individual young children (2-year-olds) engage in musicking, and that they also initiative various novel activities: such as conducting, dancing, singing, and exploring instruments. In these activities, mobility in the room is essential for the children`s access to instruments and other artifacts and for their possibility to participate in specific activities. The musicking events evolve as multimodal events, where different participation strategies are allowed and creative improvisations involve both musical and extra-musical actions. But a major finding is that the music pedagogues’ responsive uptake and creative improvisations are critical for the individual children`s ability to participate in specific activities and for bringing together the individual child and the group in collaborative musicking.

Keywords: musicking, participation, interaction, multimodality, creative improvisation, semiotic resources.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Barn- och ungdomsvetenskapliga institutionen , 2013. , 129 p.
Keyword [en]
Musicking, participation, interaction, multimodality, creative improvisation, semiotic resources
Keyword [sv]
Musicking, participation, interaktion, multimodalitet, kreativ improvisation, semiotiska resurser
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Child and Youth Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-88733ISBN: 978-91-637-2833-4 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-88733DiVA: diva2:613061
Presentation
2013-03-21, Sal 101, Frescati Hagväg 20, Stockholm, 15:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Projects
Forskarskolan: Globalisering, literacy och utforskande lärprocesser: Förskolebarns språk, läsande, skrivande och matematiserande (GUL).
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2013-03-26 Created: 2013-03-26 Last updated: 2016-10-07Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Towards Musicking in a Public Sphere: 1-3 year olds and music pedagogues negotiating a music didactic identity in a Swedish preschool
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards Musicking in a Public Sphere: 1-3 year olds and music pedagogues negotiating a music didactic identity in a Swedish preschool
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis explores alternative ways of staging music in preschool. The ‘preschool subject of music’ is approached as a social and cultural construct that is embedded in discursive negotiations. Participants in the study are 1-3 year-old children and their music pedagogues, working in the preschool on a daily basis. In three studies, the negotiation of a local music ‘didactic identity’ is examined by answering research questions related to three different discursive levels: (i) the micro-level of face-to-face interaction; (ii) the level of pedagogue’s conceptions; and (iii) the political/societal level. Study I examines the participants’ use of semiotic resources in their co-construction of musicking events. By means of micro-analyses of video-recordings it is shown that mobility in the room is essential for the children’s access to instruments and other artefacts, and for their possibility to influence music activities. Other crucial conditions concern the pedagogues’ responsive uptake and improvisatory approach, and that the activities are open to other forms of expression. Study II explores conceptions of the ‘child’ and conceptions of ‘music’ in four music pedagogues’ talk in a group interview. Different conceptions of the ‘child’ are seen to interrelate with certain ontological and functional conceptions of ‘music’ that involve diverse opportunities for children’s (bodily) agency. This analysis is made by means of discursive psychology. Study III examines the music practices from a political and philosophical perspective, using Hannah Arendt’s concept of the ‘public sphere’. This third perspective shows how this preschool’s music practices create a public sphere by seriously putting into practice equality and plurality as values and principles that increase the equality between children and adults. Age power structures are thereby challenged, and the children can be seen as citizens in the ‘here and now’, and not in some distant future when they are grown-ups. Also, the ‘preschool subject of music’ itself becomes a negotiated issue.

Implications for preschool practice and preschool teacher education are discussed, and further research is suggested within other educational areas regarding how pedagogues’ interpretations of the concept of ‘children’s participation’ and ‘influence’ impact on specific preschool subjects, such as music.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education, Stockholm University, 2016. 144 p.
Keyword
Music education, musicking, early childhood education, preschool, age power structures, very young children, subject specific didactics, public sphere, Hannah Arendt, cultural studies
National Category
Music Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Subject Learning and Teaching
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-134142 (URN)978-91-7649-517-9 (ISBN)978-91-7649-518-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-11-25, Vivi Täckholmsalen (Q-salen), NPQ-huset, Svante Arrhenius väg 20, Stockholm, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following paper was unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 2: In press.

Available from: 2016-11-01 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2017-04-18Bibliographically approved

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