Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
"How Can I Gain Skills if I Don't Practice?'' The Dynamics of Prohibitive Silence against Pre-Marital Pregnancy and Sex in Zimbabwe
HIV/AIDS, Sexually Transmitted Infections, and Tuberculosis Unit, Human Sciences Research Council, Durban, South Africa.
Division of Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Internationell sexuell och reproduktiv hälsa/Larsson)
Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health. (Internationell sexuell och reproduktiv hälsa/Larsson)
2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 1, e53058- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Young people face sexual and reproductive health (SRH) problems including Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). It is critical to continue documenting their situation including the contexts they live in. As part of a larger study that explored perspectives of men to SRH and more specifically abortion and contraceptive use, 546 pupils (51% female; age range 9-25 years) from a rural area in Zimbabwe were invited to write anonymously questions about growing up or other questions they could not ask adults for fear or shame. The pupils were included following descriptions by adults of the violence that is unleashed on unmarried young people who engaged in sex, used contraceptives, or simply suggested doing so. The questions by the young people pointed to living in a context of prohibitive silence; their sexuality was silenced and denied. As a consequence they had poor knowledge and their fears and internal conflicts around sexuality and pregnancy were not addressed. Current action suggests concerted effort at the policy level to deal with young people's SRH in Zimbabwe. It nevertheless remains necessary, as a way to provide support to these efforts, to continue examining what lessons can be drawn from the past, and how the past continues to reflect in and shape present dynamics and relations. There is also need to look more critically at life skill education, which has previously been described as having failed to address adequately the practical needs of young people. Life skill education in Zimbabwe has rarely been systematically evaluated. A fuller understanding is also needed of the different factors co-existing in contemporary African societies and how they have been and continue to be constituted within history, and the implications to the promotion of adolescent SRH.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 8, no 1, e53058- p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
URN: urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-196065DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0053058ISI: 000314021500010OAI: diva2:609279
Available from: 2013-03-05 Created: 2013-03-04 Last updated: 2013-07-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(160 kB)167 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 160 kBChecksum SHA-512
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lindmark, GunillaAhlberg, Beth Maina
By organisation
Department of Women's and Children's Health
In the same journal
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 167 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

Altmetric score

Total: 284 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link